Paper Sessions

SUNDAY: 10:15 AM - 10:45 AM

US Public Policy on Health Literacy

Sunday, Sept. 26th
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
Doty B

Limited health literacy is a pressing issue in the United States, where almost one-half of the adult population has difficulty understanding and using the health information presented to them on an everyday basis. A review of the literature reveals possible public policy solutions to this issue, namely the provision of federal funding for research related to health literacy and the implementation of policies that affect systemic change in our nation's health care system and educational system. The objectives of this paper are to outline these solutions, provide a history of US public policy related to health literacy, and highlight the implications for libraries. A brief background to the concept of health literacy is also provided. Particular attention is paid to The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy, the recently released policy statement from the US Department of Health and Human Services. This document represents the most detailed account to date outlining the federal government's position on health literacy.

Presenter:

Amber Burtis
Health Sciences Librarian
Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Amber Burtis is Health Sciences Librarian at Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She received a MLIS from Kent State Universit, a BA in anthropology from Ohio University, and is currently working on a MPH in community health education at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

Visualizing & Defining Knowledge in Health Literacy

Sunday, Sept. 26th
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
Vilas A

Question: Concerning health literacy, what constitutes knowledge and how can that knowledge be effectively obtained and conveyed?

Background: Generally, information can be defined as meaning conveyed to an intended receiver and the purpose of a word is to convey meaning. What meaning any word conveys depends upon the semantics that are associated with it and the environment that the word is used in. Basically, words assume different roles, which convey different meanings depending on the context and environment. This implies that words inherit meaning from their environment and if the environment of use changes, then the word meaning may also change.

Purpose: Within the scope of health literacy, the basis of knowledge is a combination of information and data that have been made accessible and shared. Knowledge starts as data; data alone does not necessarily convey meaning. Information is conceived as data related to other data, thereby adapting some meaning. Although information and data are strategic, albeit intangible, potential products, what eventually becomes valuable is knowledge, which is assumed to be the product of learning through experience. By exploring the relationship between information, the environment, and experience, one can grasp the complexity of health literacy. But by demonstrating a unique model that visually represents these interactions, one can understand how knowledge in health literacy is obtained and how it can be effectively conveyed.

Presenter:

Jean Gudenas, MLIS
Coordinator of Outreach and Web Services & Research Services Librarian
Loyola University

Jean Gudenas is the Head of Serials Support Services at Loyola University Health Sciences Library and received her MLIS from University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. While her background is in philosophy of information, she not-so-secretly believes that she is a sometimes-evil superhero. Her goal is to someday have an action figure made out of her likeness.

Step Up, Step Forward and Join the Team

Sunday, Sept. 26th
10:15 AM to 10:45 AM
Vilas B

In the spring of 2009 I became coordinator of a liaison program which was successful, yet fragmented.  My job was to take a group of people who were all doing liaison duties simultaneously but independently and turn them into a team.  Almost immediately, we faced tragedy.  That tragedy brought us together and emphasized the point that we could not continue to work in isolation.  We needed to establish more collaboration, understanding and partnership.  We changed our habits, creating consistent teaching curricula and handouts, and, most importantly, crossing liaison lines.  We began to understand that we are better as a team than as a group of individuals.  In the meantime, liaisons have come and gone, further emphasizing the need for teamwork.  Future plans include consistent naming of files and a better-structured shared drive, converting the remaining handouts and teaching guides to a new, consistent style, and creating a database of teaching examples.

Presenter:

Kelly Thormodson, MLIS
Coordinator, Education & Research
Hardin Library for the Health Sciences
University of Iowa

SUNDAY: 10:45 AM - 11:15 AM

Consumer Health Information Access for Clinical Sites of the Iowa Institute on Clinical & Translational Science

Sunday, Sept. 26th
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Doty B

The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences is collaborating with the University of Iowa Institute for Clinical and Translational Science's Community Engagement program to provide access to consumer health information for patients and their families at four Iowa community health centers based across the state in Davenport, Waterloo, Des Moines, and Sioux City. These communities were targeted based on the number of underserved populations in the area. This eighteen month project, beginning in June of 2009, is funded through a grant from the National Library of Medicine.

The goal of this project is for the patients to better understand their health issues and be more active in their health care or their loved one's care. This will be accomplished by installing an information kiosk in the patient waiting rooms of all four clinics. An easy-to-navigate consumer-focused health information Web site targeted to the specific communities of each clinic will be accessible from the kiosk.

This project began with a series of onsite interviews to get more information installing the workstations, patient demographics and important health topics. Equipment and promotional items were purchases shortly after the interviews were completed. A consumer-focused health information Web site was created using the LibGuide knowledge sharing system for libraries. At the time of this writing, provider training sessions have been conducted at three out of the four clinics. This will be followed by training session for the patients.

Presenter:

Chris Childs
Educational & Outreach Librarian
Hardin Library
University of Iowa

Chris Childs is an Education and Outreach Librarian at the University of Iowa’s Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.  He is the liaison for the College of Public Health and Community Outreach.  He is responsible for all state wide outreach programs for the Hardin Library.  He receive his M.S. degree in Library Science from the University of North Texas.

Linda J. Walton, M.L.S.
Associate University Librarian & Director
Hardin Library for the Health Sciences
University of Iowa

Building the Future with Community Health Information

Sunday, Sept. 26th
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Vilas A

The Western Illinois University Libraries have developed an outreach program called “Building the Future with Community Health Information (BFCHI).” Developed through funding provided by the National Library of Medicine, the program provides “train the trainer” programs demonstrating and promoting NLM’s MedlinePlus and GoLocal to library staff and health professionals in the West Central Illinois region. The BFCHI also presents educational programs on MedlinePlus to the general community. The Western Illinois University Libraries created the BFCHI in response to the challenges now facing the residents of the largely rural West Central Illinois region. Although primarily devoted to the information needs of students and faculty members, the Western Illinois University Libraries also serves as the de facto information provider for the west central region of the state of Illinois. Over the past several decades, global economic forces have permanently altered communities in west central Illinois. These communities often suffer from economic, and population decline, aging populations, and deteriorating Main Streets. These changes have dramatically affected health care delivery and access to health information.

Paper topics include:

  • The grant process and the goals of the NLM in providing funding
  • How the program fits the mission of university libraries in general and Western Illinois university specifically
  • The partnerships that the program has fostered with local community health providers
  • Overview of the groups that have received training and their response to the training
  • The role of new technologies in meeting the goals of the grant

Presenters:

Sean Cordes
Instruction Services Coordinator
Western Illinois University

Jeff Matlak
Electronic Resources Librarian
Western Illinois University

HeLP MN Seniors: an evidence based health literacy program for seniors

Sunday, Sept. 26th
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Vilas B

Objective: The goal of the Health Literacy Program for Minnesota Seniors (HeLP MN Seniors) is to create an evidence-based health literacy training program to help seniors improve communication with their health care providers and find and assess health information on the Internet so they can become active participants in the patient care partnership.

Methods: A two-part workshop series was created focusing on clear communications with health care providers and seeking health information on the Internet. Workshops were pilot-tested with residents of a senior living community. Workshop content was developed using existing health literacy/health information literacy curricula that was modified to meet the specific needs of older adults, and was further customized based upon various assessment findings.

Results: Over 30 seniors participated in the pilot program. Workshop evaluation results demonstrated an increased awareness of key steps to improving health literacy and consumer empowerment. Post-workshop survey results showed several tools were used by participants, and that participants were more empowered to ask questions and more successful in finding online health information.

Conclusion: HeLP MN Seniors has successfully gathered evidence related to teaching health literacy skills to seniors through the use of formal evaluation tools, and has applied this information to the development of a model training program.

Presenter:

Anne Beschnett, MLIS
University of Minnesota
Health Sciences Libraries

Anne Beschnett is the outreach librarian the University of Minnesota’s Health Sciences Libraries, and also serves as the liaison librarian to the Allied Health departments.  Anne received her B.A. in Classics in 2003 from Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN, and her MLIS from Dominican University in 2006.  Prior to taking on the outreach librarian position in 2009, Anne worked for three years in the technical services department at the Health Sciences Libraries.

SUNDAY: 11:15 AM - 11:45 AM

Librarians' Roles in Evidence Based Dentistry Education in the U.S. and Canada

Sunday, Sept. 26th
11:15 AM -11:45 AM
Doty B

As the dental profession continues to adopt Evidence Based Dentistry (EBD), dental librarians are facing unique opportunities and challenges in their support of EBD education. This study describes the current roles of dental librarians in EBD education including their perceptions of EBD and barriers to their involvement. A web-based survey was distributed to the dental librarians and 71% responded. The results showed that the majority of dental librarians in North America are playing multiple and diverse roles in EBD education. The most frequently cited barrier to their involvement is the low level of interest from the dental faculty/student/school. Most dental librarians felt competent in supporting EBD, although continuing education needs in both EBD and teaching skills were pointed out. In general, dental librarians are eager to support EBD education and they recognize the issues regarding EBD adoption faced by the dental profession.

Presenter:

Xiaomei Gu, BDS, MS, MSLS
Iowa City, Iowa

Xiaomei Gu recently graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a Master of Science in Library Science (M.S.L.S.) degree and a Certificate in Bioinformatics. She is currently the Emerging Technologies Specialist at the Kirkwood Community College Library. She enjoys working with information, people, and technology.

The McMaster Experience: learning how to teach evidence-based clinical practice

slides | teaching techniques

Sunday, Sept. 26th
11:15 AM -11:45 AM
Vilas A

Teaching Evidence-Based Clinical Practice (EBCP) effectively is a challenge at the best of times.  For a Health Sciences librarian with new EBCP teaching responsibilities and only a basic knowledge of EBCP concepts, the prospect can be daunting.  Attending the week-long workshop “Learning How to Teach Evidence-Based Clinical Practice” at McMaster University provided a wealth of teaching tips and a greater understanding of EBCP concepts.  EBCP concepts were presented and teaching techniques modeled each day by EBCP luminaries such as Gordon Guyatt, Steven Haynes, Scott Richardson, and Deborah Cook.  In small working groups, participants were encouraged to present an aspect of EBCP outside their comfort zone in both subject area and presentation style. Presentations were critiqued first by the presenter, and then by each member of the group. Being the only librarian participant in a small working group of MDs, PhDs, and Pharm Ds made a stressful situation even more intense. This presentation will describe the McMaster learning experience from a librarian’s perspective and include teaching tips gleaned from the workshop.

Presenter:

Edith Starbuck
Information Services Librarian
Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library
University of Cincinnati

Edith Starbuck is an Information Services Librarian at the University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library.  Her responsibilities include electronic resources collection development, developing and teaching classes on evidence-based practice, information retrieval and management, and instructional technology.  Edith received her BA in 1990 from the College of Mount St. Joseph and her Master of Library Science in 1992 from Indiana University. 

The Resource Library as Host for an eResources Consortium

Sunday, Sept. 26th
11:15 AM -11:45 PM
Vilas B

This presentation reviews the creation, implementation and management of an electronic resources consortium between the Kornhauser Library of the University of Louisville and several regional hospital libraries. By the late 1990's Kornhauser Library was already making a considerable investment in electronic resources. By sharing this investment with hospital libraries in our area we were able to provide a set of resources the hospitals might not have been able to purchase separately and provide our medical students on rotation with consistent access to a core of medical literature. This establishment of this consortium faced several economic, legal and cooperative challenges. This presentation covers the negotiation of contracts, how content decisions are made and the management processes such as billing and technical support. After over ten years of existence, we are now able to assess the positive and negative outcomes of this consortium and relate some lessons learned.

Presenter:

Neal Nixon
Director
Kornhauser Health Sciences Library
University of Louisville

Neal Nixon currently serves as the Director of the Kornhauser Health Sciences Library of the University of Louisville where he has worked for nearly 30 years in various capacities.  He has also been adjunct faculty in the schools of library science for both Indiana University and the University of Kentucky.  Neal has a BA in communications from the University of Kentucky, and MA in telecommunications from Michigan State and a MALS from the University of Kentucky.

SUNDAY: 2:00 PM - 2:45 PM

Taking the Mystery Out of Grant Writing

Sunday, Sept. 26th
2:00 PM - 2:45 PM
Doty B

As the difficult economic environment continues, the ability to understand foundation grants and the basics of proposal writing as alternative sources of funding becomes more important to libraries in general and medical libraries in particular. This presentation takes the mystery out of proposal writing, providing: the essentials of non-government grants; the defining features of a foundation; the basic structure of a proposal; resources for finding grant information; and additional information, including sample proposals. Participants will be able to view online resources at their leisure, as a webpage with links to resources mentioned in the presentation and more will be made freely available.

Presenter:

Rose Guerrieri, MLIS
Library Director
Assistant Professor
Kent State University at Trumbull

Rose Guerrieri is currently the library director at Kent State University at Trumbull in Warren, Ohio.  She has been a librarian for 14 years in academic, medical school and hospital settings.  She received her MLIS from Kent State University.  Prior to being a librarian, Rose worked as a registered nurse for 15 years.

The Level of Evidence Utilized to Answer General Practitioners Questions

Sunday, Sept. 26th
2:00 PM - 2:45 PM
Doty B

Detractors of Evidence Based Medicine argue that there is a lack of top-rate evidence to be able to effectively practice EBM. The aim of this research was to determine the level of evidence that information professionals utilized to answer clinical questions posed by general practitioners.

The four key objectives were:

  • To determine the highest level of evidence per question;
  • To determine the number of questions not answered due to a lack of evidence;
  • To determine the number of times a guideline was used to answer a question;
  • To determine the type of websites used to answer questions.

Clinical questions and the evidence located to answer them were identified from two national primary care answering services, namely ATTRACT (http://www.attract.wales.nhs.uk/) and NLH Primary Care Answering Service (http://www.clinicalanswers.nhs.uk/index.cfm). The questions and type of evidence (such as systematic review, guideline, etc) used to answer the question were noted. The data was collected for four months, from 1st March 2008 to 30th June 2008.

Level 1 or 2 evidence answered 19.3% of the questions from ATTRACT and 10.3% from NLH Primary Care Answering Service. Two of the 57 ATTRACT questions were unanswered due to a lack of evidence and 125 of the 724 NLH Primary Care Answering Service were unanswered. Over forty percent of the questions were answered using guidelines. Fourteen websites were used to answer questions sent to ATTRACT and 116 by NLH Primary Care.

Presenter:

Karen Davies
Assistant Professor
School of Information Studies
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Karen Davies joined the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2009 as an Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science. She previously worked as an information professional in academia and health (primary, acute and public health) in the UK.

Dyslexia: Health, Literacy and Libraries (Midwest Chapter/MLA Update)

Sunday, Sept. 26th
2:00 PM - 2:45 PM
Vilas A

Librarians are in pivotal positions to improve literacy for individuals with dyslexia, a reading difficulty that impacts more than 10% of the population.   An explosion of research has occurred in our understanding of dyslexia in the past few years.  Enhanced awareness and updated knowledge of dyslexia and related consequences are critical for librarians who seek to improve literacy programs, collections and reference services.  Medical librarians can support improved health outcomes by providing information to health providers about health literacy and dyslexia. 

Dr. Julie Gocey is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UW School of Medicine and Public Health and the founder of the Learning Difference Network. Dr. Gocey will speak on the medical aspects of dyslexia, health literacy and effective community services. Margery Katz is a librarian and dyslexia reading therapist.  Ms. Katz will speak about dyslexia, evidence-based multisensory reading instruction, and how librarians can make a difference.

Presenters:

Julie A. Gocey, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
UW School of Medicine and Public Health

Dr. Julie Gocey is Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UW School of Medicine and Public Health and the founder of the Learning Difference Network. She has experience with community advocacy, health and educational consequences of low literacy, and difficulties with serving patients with dyslexia and other learning problems. Dr. Gocey will speak on the medical aspects of dyslexia, health literacy and effective community services. Dr. Gocey received her undergraduate degree at Indiana State University, her medical degree at Southern Illinois University and completed her pediatric residency at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.

Margery Katz, MA, JD
Librarian
WI Dept of Employee Trust Funds Library

Margery Katz is a solo librarian at the Wisconsin Department of Employee Trust Funds Library and a dyslexia reading therapist in private practice. Margery received her BA in History, a Masters in Library Science, and a law degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Margery is trained in evidence-based multisensory reading instruction including Orton-Gillingham, Project Read and other programs. Ms. Katz will review what librarians should know about dyslexia, literacy and health literacy, and how librarians can make a difference.

SUNDAY: 2:45 PM - 3:30 PM

It Doesn’t Always "Rain" from the Ceiling: what’s in your emergency kit?

Sunday, Sept. 26th
2:45 PM - 3:30 PM
Doty B

When discussing emergency planning in libraries, most often thoughts in the Midwest go immediately to coping with large disasters such as environmental flooding, fire, tornados, and evacuation. Every library should already have written plans in place developed most often by directives from their institution to be prepared for this type of emergencies.

However, it is the minor emergencies that more frequently cause chaos in the library. Our two libraries, Lacera Medial Library in Munster Indiana and Crawford Library of the Health Sciences in Rockford Illinois have coped with a combined 12 ceiling, wall, and window water leaks, flying mammals, mold, and potential violence in the past six years. Librarians and staff quickly learn to expect the unusual and think fast on their feet to contain the damage and prevent it from worsening. Action must be prompt and proactive and with minimal disruption of services to our clientele.

Using our experiences, we have developed our LEK or library emergency kit and plans to provide an immediate application and hopefully, a solution to each of these problems as they occur. Staff involvement in developing this plan and kit is key. Knowing whom to contact in your institution and what services they provide is also crucial to effective preparedness.

There are also some unexpected positive side effects in having a solid plan and being able to bring about a rapid implementation and solution to the problem both to the library and with administration.

Presenters:

Ellen Schellhause
Health Sciences Librarian
UIC Library
Rockford, Illinois

Joan Zivich
Manager
Lacera Medical Library
Community Memorial Hospital
Munster, Indiana

Interesting Times: a library school project with real-life implications

Sunday, Sept. 26th
2:45 PM - 3:30 PM
Vilas A

What happens when a brand-new children's hospital loses its medical librarian and financial realities make the future unclear? How do you keep a good, but frozen, collection alive and responsive to the needs of its users, both current and future? Four students and a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) responded as a team. To better understand the physical collection left behind, we conducted a semester-long collection analysis and cataloging project; to better understand the potential user base and their needs, we developed a survey of inpatient and outpatient families connected with the children's hospital. We hope to emerge from the project with an enhanced understanding, not only of information-gathering from a specific user group, but of communication between library patrons, librarians and hospital administrators. In this paper, we report on the challenges of the project. Among them: Collection development and the physical arrangement of a facility with a future that is unclear; assessing health information needs and information-seekers in the age of HIPAA; survey development on a shoestring; and pathfinder design for users we haven't met yet

Presenters:

Catherine Arnott Smith, PhD
Assistant Professor,
UW-Madison SLIS

Catherine Arnott Smith is a former medical librarian (both academic and corporate settings) who moved into medical informatics as an NLM medical informatics predoctoral trainee. She has her PhD in medical informatics/library and information science from the University of Pittsburgh.

Pam Anan, Elizabeth Quinlan Huggins, Emily Townsend and Katherine Westby are all currently enrolled graduate students in SLIS' LIS degree program.

Coaches as Health Information Intermediaries for Student Athletes of Color

Sunday, Sept. 26th
3:45 PM - 4:30 PM
Vilas A

This qualitative research investigates the health information seeking behaviors of middle and high school athletic coaches in order to ascertain the social world and information cultural of student athletes of color. The aim of this study explores how athletic coaches serve as health information sources in the lives of adolescent athletes of color. The goal of this research study seeks to understand three key elements: (1) the questions students of color asked coaches; (2) the preferred communication style in providing answers to those questions; and (3) the information sources coaches used to answer the questions. The research also seeks to understand how students of color approached coaches with health questions. The interviews captured coaches' experiences as health information intermediaries for adolescents of color, coaches' experiences searching for health information, and libraries/librarians' role in offering assistance.

Elfreda A. Chatman's Life in the Round theory is used as a guiding conceputal framework for understanding the health information seeking behaviors of athletic middle and high school coaches and the small world community of which they are members. There are four concepts that are intertwined with the Life in the Round theory: small world, social norms, social types, and worldview. The four concepts were used to examine sports coaches' small world and their intermediary role for student athletes of color.

Employing a combination of research methodologies, the author administered a pre-interview survey and conducted a semi-structured face-to-face interview. Overall, the results highlight that when trust is in place athletic coaches act as intermediaries for student athletes of color and provide a worldview for its small world members. The members in the small world of athletic coaches include school nurses, social workers, and the athletic trainer. Librarians are missing from this small world. However, librarians can play a significant role in the small world of sports coaches (and athletes of color) by filling an information gap.

Presenter:

Tammy L. Mays
Fourth year Doctoral Student
School of Library & Information Studies
University of Wisconsin - Madison

Tammy L. Mays is currently a fourth year doctoral student in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's School of Library and Information Studies program, focusing on the health information seeking needs and behaviors of athletic coaches. She is the recipient of the 2007 American Libraries Association's Spectrum Doctoral Fellowship. Tammy received her MLIS degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Library and Information and completed her undergraduate B.A. degree in Biology at Fisk University.

Monday AM, September 27, 2010
MONDAY: 10:15 AM - 10:45 AM

Taubman Health Sciences Library Connects with University of Michigan's Mini Med School

Monday, Sept. 27th
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
Doty B

In 2001 the University of Michigan launched Mini Med School - a six week educational program designed to provide participants with a basic understanding of various health topics and disease processes. During the inaugural session, participants were exposed to a different topic each week, while in later sessions one topic spanned the entire six-week program. In 2003, the Taubman Health Sciences Libraries (THSL) began providing participants with a supplemental syllabus, which included web pages, journal articles, and book chapters that complemented the lecture content that the University of Michigan Medical School Faculty were presenting. This collaboration continues to the present day. We will discuss the establishment of Mini Med School, its purpose, how popular it has become in the community, and the role that THSL has played and continues to play in its success.

Presenters:

Mark MacEachern, MLIS
Liaison Librarian
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Mark MacEachern is a liaison services librarian at the University of Michigan's Taubman Health Sciences Library.  He received his Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Western Ontario and - before accepting his current position - worked as a Librarian intern in the University Library system at McMaster University.

Merle Rosenzweig
Liaison and Research Librarian
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Merle Rosenzweig is a Liaison Librarian at the Taubman Health Sciences Library (THSL) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Michigan. She holds a B.A. degree from Wayne State University in Detroit Michigan and an A.M.L.S. degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Michigan.

Library Advocacy: a Wisconsin example

Monday, Sept. 27th
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
Vilas A

In October 2009, a member of the Wisconsin Council on Library and Network Development and members of the Wisconsin Health Sciences Library Association (WHSLA) visited with representatives from the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Quality Assurance to discuss the enforcement of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services Administrative Code Chapter 124.09, Staff Library. The code states that hospitals shall maintain a health sciences library with easily accessible, organized, current, print and non-print materials to meet the needs of hospital staff. Despite this regulation, we discovered approximately six hospital library closures in Wisconsin in the past five years. We wanted to discuss the enforcement of this regulation and better understand how the Division of Quality Assurance enforces regulations.

We discussed the importance of hospital libraries and librarians in saving money for organizations and patients and in contributing to the overall mission of healthcare organizations. We also shared our listing of hospital library closures. The representatives reacted positively to our information and agreed to enter the hospital library closures as complaints into a database that surveyors review before visiting a hospital. We learned that the Division of Quality Assurance primarily enforces federal hospital regulations and that the surveyors only survey a Wisconsin hospital when they receive a complaint. This may explain why the Division is unaware of hospital closures in the state of Wisconsin. The meeting was productive and informative, but we still have work to do to ensure the presence of hospital librarians in hospital regulations and standards. In Wisconsin, we will continue to advocate for the requirement of a professional librarian to operate the library in any future revision of the code.

Presenters:

Mary Bayorgeon
419 E. Greenfield St.
Appleton, WI

Eileen Severson, MLIS
Supervisor, Library & Health Information Services
Gundersen Lutheran Health System
La Crosse, WI

MONDAY: 10:45 AM - 11:15 AM

Current Patterns of Engagement between Librarians and Faculty in Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs

Monday, Sept. 27th
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Doty B

Purpose: This presentation reports on the results of a study to determine the extent to which faculty in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs are currently working with librarians to support teaching and learning in the DNP curriculum, and the attitudes and perceptions of faculty about these connections. The DNP is the new terminal degree for advanced practice nurses, and the program was chosen to study because of its emerging importance and the manageable number of currently active programs. Also, the DNP curriculum is especially relevant for librarian involvement because of the focus on evidence-based practice, which requires strong information-finding and evaluation skills.

Methods: The target population was faculty members who had taught a class to DNP students within the last year (since January 2009). In May 2010, an email was sent to the program directors of the 116 active DNP programs in the country, describing the study and asking them to forward the request for participation (containing a link to the online survey) to faculty in their DNP program.

Results: The survey was open from May 5-June 4th, 2010 and received 118 responses. Responses from 53 different DNP programs (46%) were self-identified, and 15 respondents did not identify a school so the percentage of programs responding is likely at least 50%. The preliminary findings will be presented, as well as a discussion of future directions of the study.

Presenter:

Elizabeth Fine, MLIS
Liaison Librarian
University of Minnesota
Bio-Medical Library

Liz Fine works in the Bio-Medical Library at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where she is the librarian liaison to the School of Nursing. She received her MLIS from Dominican University, via the College of St Catherine in St Paul, Minnesota.  She has been at the University of Minnesota since 2001, and in her current position since 2005.

Web Site Redesign on a Shoestring Budget

slides | handout

Monday, Sept. 27th
10:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Vilas A

Are you looking to redesign your library's website to better serve your patrons? Usability testing is one important part of redesigning a library website, and you don't have to spend much money or have vast technical expertise to do it!  We will show you helpful tools such as website task analysis, developing personas, tracking reference question topics and how to use website statistics, website search logs, and Google Analytics.  Come learn some tips from the librarians at the Rural Assistance Center and Health Workforce Information Center to make your website work better for your users.

Presenters:

Holly Gabriel
Information Specialist
Rural Assistance Center
Grand Forks, ND

Holly Gabriel is a librarian for the Rural Assistance Center, a digital library of rural health and human service resources.  Holly provides reference services for patrons regarding their specific needs, completes usability testing, creates information guides on rural health topics, completes searches of databases, and indexes articles for inclusion on the library's website.

Laura Trude
Information Specialist
Health Workforce Information Center

Laura Trude is an information specialist for the Health Workforce Information Center (HWIC), a digital library of health workforce resources. Besides providing reference services, indexing resources, and writing articles, Laura conducts usability testing and previously created a new website for the College of St. Catherine's Office of Academic Affairs.

MONDAY: 11:15 AM - 11:45 AM

Embedded Librarian: using email through distance learning software and jing to increase outreach and reference service to nursing students

Monday, Sept. 27th
11:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Doty B

Due to time and scheduling constraints in working with online or distance nursing students in real time, a nursing librarian used a combination of anticipatory e-mail based tips (delivered via WebCT) and brief online video screen captures to improve reference service to several sections of a graduate research course during Spring 2010. Informal screencasts can give distance learners, as well as practicing nurses who cannot fit an in-person visit into their schedules, the benefits of a real-time demo (that can be viewed at their own convenience) with a relatively small investment of the librarian’s time. This presentation will describe using Jing for distance learners, illustrate the unanticipated benefits and drawbacks of using e-mail and Jing, and suggest potential methods to “step up” this effort through more formalized expansion and assessment in the future.

Presenter:

Ximena Chrisagis, M.S. (LIS), M.A., AHIP
Nursing Librarian
Wright State University Libraries
Dayton, OH

Ximena Chrisagis is currently Nursing Librarian at the Paul Laurence Dunbar Library at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. She has been a full time reference, instruction, and collection development librarian in the health sciences disciplines at Wright State since 1998 and was based at the Fordham Health Sciences Library until June 2009. Ximena earned her M.S. in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her M.A. in Public History from Wright State University, and she is a distinguished member of AHIP.  As a result of her public history degree, she works one day per week in the Special Collections and Archives Department. 

Lights, Camera, Action! How Screen Capture Software can put You in the Director's Chair

Monday, Sept. 27th
11:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Vilas A

Remember when desktop publishing was king? Well now we're stepping it up a notch and breaking into the desktop video production business. And you won't need expensive cameras, or extensive training. You only need a little practice, a creative streak, and an inexpensive headset microphone. There is no limit to the topics that can be covered in a 1 - 5 minute video that can be created in a short of time - with very little training - and with little upfront expense.

  • Post a video on your website that answers commonly asked reference questions
  • Create a tutorial of effective tips and tricks for searching a database
  • Film a demonstration on the operation of a software package

This presentation will provide information on what screen capture software is - what it does - and the various programs that are available ranging in price from free to hundreds of dollars. Using one of the free software packages, the speaker will demonstrate the process of filming a one-minute video. And, finally, present the reasons why librarians can and should spend some time in the Director's Chair.

Presenter:

Barbara A. Gushrowski, MLS
Access and Instructional Services Librarian
Indiana University School of Dentistry

Barb Gushrowski received her MLS in 1997 and has worked in a variety of libraries including, art school, museum, newspaper, and hospital. She is currently Access and Instructional Services Librarian at the Indiana University School of Dentistry in Indianapolis.

Monday PM, September 27, 2010
MONDAY: 3:45 PM - 4:30 PM

University of Michigan Survival Flight: role of the Taubman health sciences library

presentation | Angels with Wings profile

Monday, Sept. 27th
3:45 PM - 4:30 PM
Doty B

The University of Michigan Survival Flight has been in existence for twenty-six years. During this period of time, there have been a multitude of rescues: critically ill and badly injured patients moved to tertiary care institutions, precious body parts transported to be implanted in other patients, and, literally, lives saved. The fleet consisting of three helicopters and a fixed wing jet plane flies over 160,000 miles a year, a total of over 4 million miles since it began flying in 1983. The medical staff consists of 20 nurses, 9 communication specialists, 8 pilots, and 8 mechanics. There are three yearly conferences at which new material is presented to those both directly and indirectly affiliated with the Survival Flight. The librarians of Taubman Health Sciences Library (THSL) have been taking part in the annual University of Michigan Survival Flight's fall conferences for the past four years.

Approximately, 185 participants take place in this three-day conference. The librarians' role is to distribute reliable online sources of health information, both for consumers and health professionals, as well as answering questions while the conference is in progress. The THSL librarians have always been pleased to have the opportunity to supply this essential information to this important contingent of health professionals and feel that by doing so they are contributing in a small way to the success of the Survival Flight.

Presenter:

Gerald Abrams
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Carrie Ashton
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Jon Crane
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Merle Rosenzweig
Liaison and Research Librarian
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Merle Rosenzweig is a Liaison Librarian at the Taubman Health Sciences Library (THSL) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Michigan. She holds a B.A. degree from Wayne State University in Detroit Michigan and an A.M.L.S. degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Michigan.

Anna Ercoli Schnitzer, AMLS
Liaison and Disabilities Librarian
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan

Anna Ercoli Schnitzer is the Liaison/Disabilities Librarian at Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan.  She received her education at Hood College in Frederick, MD, the University of Maryland in College Park, MD, and the University of Michigan School of Library and Information Science in Ann Arbor, MI.

Information Seeking Behaviors of Local Public Health Practitioners: a case study from a Kentucky health department

Monday, Sept. 27th
3:45 PM - 4:30 PM
Vilas A

Objective: To better understand the information seeking behaviors of public health practitioners in order to better tailor information services to practitioners in Kentucky, and, ultimately, facilitate communication between public health practitioners, researchers, policy makers, and librarians.

Methods: An electronic survey was distributed via email to directors of health departments (HDs) in Kentucky with the request that it would be forwarded to all full-time equivalents (FTEs) at their respective location. Results were collected through Survey Monkey and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and SAS.

Results: Response rates varied tremendously between HDs with a poor overall rate (n=114, <1% state-wide HD FTEs). As a result, and due to a substantial response rate from one HD (n=57, 50% of the total responses and 79% of this particular HD's FTEs), the analysis was limited to only that HD. From these results we observed an overreliance on colleagues and peer HDs for information while more traditional research resources were underutilized. Participants also reported time limitations as the most significant barrier to information seeking.

Conclusions: Observations from this study indicate that colleagues are the most utilized resource, thus we as librarians need to become viewed as colleagues of the HD practitioners. We propose that instructing practitioners on where to find information may not be the most effective way of guiding them to those more traditional research resources. That is, rather than attempting to change the behavior of the practitioner, it may be more effective to change our own behavior.

Presenter:

Robert M Shapiro II, MALS
Clinical Reference Librarian
Medical Center Library
University of Kentucky