Poster Presentations

Poster Presentation:
Monday, September 27th, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM, Capitol Room East

Reference Services Trends in Regional Academic Health Sciences Libraries

Objective:  Reference services have changed dramatically over the past five years.  The purpose of this study is to discover the trends in reference services at regional academic health sciences libraries in the United States.

Methods:  There are over 120 medical schools in the United States.  Approximately half of these medical schools have regional sites.  A survey has been developed to inquire into the practices and policies of reference services at these regional academic health sciences libraries.  The survey includes questions reqarding:  the role of the reference librarian, most significant changes in reference services for the past five years, what types of library instruction is performed, and what types of outreach activities is performed. A request for participation to a phone interview will be distributed by email to the regional medical schools libraries.  Data will be collected by the researcher from these telephone conversations.

Presenter:

Felicia A. Barrett, MLS
Assistant Health Sciences Librarian
University of Illinois at Chicago
Rockford, Illinois

Stepping Forward: Moving from a Print to Online Book Collection for Hospital Libraries

Background. Allina Library Services serves 11 hospitals and 85 clinics in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Historically the Library maintained print book collections at 4 of these hospitals. Continued budget constraints resulted in collections becoming outdated, with approximately 85% of titles more than 5 years old. A print-based collection meant limited access to users at other hospital or clinic sites. Circulation and reshelving data showed declining usage, while usage of our modest e-book collection was growing.

Objective. The library book collection was inadequate to serve Allina's need. We developed a project in 2008 to evaluate a possible solution by moving towards a more robust online book collection.

Methods. Library Services staff undertook a small-scale survey to assess users needs and preferences. We also performed financial analysis of print versus online collection building over a 5-year period and evaluated the current state of the online book market, including purchase models.

Results. Our analysis confirmed that given our current challenges, it made sense to transition to an online book collection, retaining a small print collection for business continuity purposes. A 5-year plan was developed, outlining print and e-book expenditures each year, with a goal of purchasing approximately 80 new titles per year, using a one-time purchase model where possible. This poster will show findings and steps taken towards implementation of our plan.

Presenters:

Pamela Barnard, MSLS
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

James Bulger, MLIS
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

Sharon Kambeitz, MLIS, AHIP
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

Anita von Geldern, MLIS
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

Size (and Location) Do Matter:  Website Re-Design and the IM Chat Widget

The Bio-Medical Library installed an IM chat function on their recently re-vamped main webpage with much fanfare and anticipation in the Spring of 2007.  The IM link was located next to the more conventional email, phone and other live chat links in the top portion of the left hand navigation bar.  Over time, this service saw very little use, with a few random "chats" recorded every month.  In late October 2009, the main webpage underwent a re-design.  While the re-design itself was not overly radical, it had one significant change – in addition to the IM chat link in the left-hand navigation bar, an actual chat widget was embedded on the page that was visible "above the fold."  Instantly, IM chat usage rose astronomically to 1100% above of its previous usage.  It became not uncommon for reference staff to need to handle several "chats" at the same time.  This demonstration of the power of a visible IM chat widget, as opposed to a link, is leading to a campaign to have  IM chat widgets embedded in more sections of the University's web-presence, most particularly, the MyU/MyLibrary Portal and potential search "fail points" such as the online catalog.  The visible chat widget is providing an expanded point-of-need, real-time "live" reference service that is proving to be a powerful and greatly appreciated communication tool.

Presenters:

Katherine Chew
Associate Director for Research, Collections and Access Services
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN

Emily Reimer
Public Services Assistant
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN

The exchange of information as a dimension of social support in caregiver networks

BACKGROUND: Information exchange of the 16.8 million caregivers for children in the U.S. with special needs is not adequately understood. Many studies explore use of the internet for seeking health information, but fail to consider information exchanged through social networks (i.e., family, friends, neighbors, etc.). Examining the information needs of caregivers within the context of caregiving responsibilities and burden may lend insight into the patterns of information exchange and types of sources they rely upon.

OBJECTIVE: To explore the flow of social support, including health information, among the social networks of caregivers.

METHODS: An online survey was distributed via two electronic distribution lists for Indiana parents of children with special needs.

RESULTS: Overall, participants who provided demographic data (n = 54) were generally Caucasian, non-Hispanic, college-educated married mothers living in Central Indiana. Respondents appear to engage in sharing informational support more than they receive it. The most active social networks were those based on face-to-face, telephone, and email interactions. Age was negatively correlated with the density of telephone and social networking sites (SNS) networks, and whole network density. Two dimensions of social support (emotional and assistance) were positively correlated with network density of email, chat, and SNS networks. Sharing of information shows a significant positive correlation with the number of ties for the face-to-face (r = .377, p < .01), telephone (r = .415, p < .001), and summary (r = .396, p < .01) networks.

CONCLUSION: Caregivers engage in many types of interactions to maintain their social support networks.   

Presenter:

Heather Coates
Research Assistant
Indiana University Medical Library

Building the Future with Community Health Information

Western Illinois University is working with the National Library of Medicine, regional libraries, and regional health and service organizations to support health information and literacy needs in two counties in west central Illinois. This poster describes the framework, outreach activities, and instruction efforts that demonstrate how the project promotes and supports consumer health literacy within and beyond the library.
The project is centered upon a triage of 3 audiences: library professionals, health professionals, and public health consumers. The instructional strategy of the project is built on the idea of "train the trainer" programs for library staff and health professionals and educational programs to the general public. In a great sense, the main goal of the project is to "step forward" with the idea of how health literacy and the knowledge it fosters can benefit communities by "stepping up" the general quality of life. Key to this effort is the demonstration and promotion of National Library of Medicine web services, particularly MedLine Plus.  Through instruction sessions, partner activities, and promotional outreach and demonstrations, project audiences and public partners become mutually supportive members of a health literate community

The poster uses images and artifacts to describe the project from conception to maturity including: training and promotional materials, web screen captures, assessment surveys, data reports, the project portal site, and live action shots of demonstrations and events.

Presenters:

Sean Cordes
Instruction Services Coordinator
Western Illinois University, Malpass Library
Macomb, Illinois

Jeff Matlak
Electronic Resources Librarian
Western Illinois University, Malpass Library
Macomb, Illinois

Stepping forward with a new brand

Recently, the ProHealth Care system combined the Waukesha and Oconomowoc hospital libraries into one central resource for the entire healthcare system and renamed it ProHealth Care Library. Many of the existing print forms used by the library lacked a strong identity as they were tied to the previous library names. Thus this was a perfect time for the library to step forward with a new brand to communicate this change to the organization. A literature review of library marketing and branding reinforced the importance of having a unified brand in order to present the library in a professional manner. The major challenge of this effort was the limited amount of software available to library staff. Although a quick solution would have been to utilize the student's personal software, this would not allow the staff to edit materials after the fieldwork experience ended. Reviewing the available resources revealed a corporate Power Point template available to library staff and this quickly proved to be the ideal platform for creating all forms. By manipulating the page sizes in this program, library publications could be created in every size from the smallest circulation cards to a full size copyright poster. This ensured that every item had a cohesive look and yet still allowed for future staff editing. Because funds were limited, this also prevented the need to purchase any software to create publications. The poster highlights the process of using the corporate template to create new library print materials that communicate the new brand.

Presenter:

Dora P Davis
Graduate Student 
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Information Studies
Milwaukee, WI

How Clinical Experience may Enhance Liaison Success

This case study aims to provide a description of the specific ways that previous experience in a medical profession may lend value in the establishment of liasion relationships with academic and clinical professionals. Three examples of how I have been able to capitalize on past professional experiences over the past year will be presented: 1. involvement with nursing groups and educational endeavors at the hospital to increase evidence-based project and policy development.  2.  Outreach efforts, in conjunction with the Hardin Library Simulation Lab and Hardin Library staff, to stimulate interest in health sciences professions to youth in the state of Iowa.  3. Improvement of a program in collaboration with the Family Medicine Department inpatient staff for supporting clinical question formation and development of search expertise.

Through this poster, I will share my insight with other professionals about how past medical professional experience may be utilized to launch a second career as a medical librarian.  I will also highlight obstacles that previous clinical experience may present, and emphasize that a health sciences background is no substitute for mentoring and training. 

By presenting this project I hope to take my initial step to connect with medical librarians with experience in health sciences professions, begin to appreciate their contributions, and maybe even enhance my own

Presenter:

Jennifer DeBerg
Clinical Education Librarian
Hardin Library for the Health Sciences
Iowa City, IA

Your Friendly Neighborhood CTSI: How Clinical Translation Science Institutions Are Harnessing the Power of Social Media

One of the key functions of the Clinical Translation Science Awards (CTSAs) is to encourage and enhance community engagement, creating ways for researchers and community members to learn from one another.  This poster takes a look at which CTSAs are using social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) as part of their community engagement efforts, with a focus on what Midwest CTSAs are doing.

Methods: A broad picture of which Midwest CTSAs are doing what will be captured, using freely available tools for making word clouds and tracking Twitter history (such as first posts), looking at Facebook profiles, and exploring community engagement websites.  A general list of all CTSA social media efforts will also be captured and presented. 

Goals: The main purpose of this poster is to alert Midwest medical librarians to the community engagement efforts of their community CTSAs.  Librarians interested in social media may be able to learn from the CTSA efforts.  In addition, the librarians may be able to offer additional support to their CTSAs, providing resources and creating partnerships.  Medical libraries serve the same communities that the CTSAs are trying to reach; being aware of the other group's efforts may open channels for communication, the exchange of ideas, and the creation of best practices. 

Presenter:

Amy Donahue, MLIS, AHIP
National Library of Medicine Associate Fellow
University of Minnesota Biomedical Library
Minneapolis, MN

Working to Connect Health Resource Libraries with Consumers through Facebook in a Multi-hospital health care system

Facebook is all about sharing information, so it is likely that a Facebook presence may offer hospital libraries with an excellent opportunity to link consumers with credible health information and market library services to them.  This poster will describe our journey in developing a social media presence; detail our strategy for marketing and pushing out content; and offer insight into how best to keep Facebook postings fresh and our fans engaged.

In early 2010 we launched an Aurora Libraries' Facebook page under our parent organization's Facebook presence. Our goal for this initiative was to share with consumers interesting nuggets of current health information and provide links to supportive literature, videos, or other reliable content providers. 

After our social media department created a basic page for us, we were given administrative rights to design, monitor statistics, and post content.  We invited personal friends, family members and colleagues to become the first fans of the Aurora Libraries.  As we established a "fan" base of 50 or so, we added a Find Us on Facebook button to the Aurora Libraries' intranet pages to attract more fans to our Facebook presence. 

We primarily focused our wall postings on trendy health and wellness topics. We understand that our fans may not want to reply or post comments on our wall due to medical privacy concerns, so we do not use Facebook's "interactions this week" statistics to measure our success on Facebook, but do measure our success on an increasing fan base. 

Presenters:

Vicki Budzisz
Systems Analyst
Aurora St. Luke's Medical Center Library
Milwaukee, WI

Brenda Fay
Librarian
Aurora Sinai Medical Center Library
Milwaukee, WI

Mini Prasad
Librarian
Aurora Medical Center in Summit Library
Milwaukee, WI

Getting to Know Your Website Visitors Using Google Analytics

Web usage statistics can provide valuable information about your library's users and their use of your site. Google Analytics is a free tool that lets you track and analyze your web traffic data. By being aware of what users search for, which pages are the most popular, and other information Google Analytics can provide, librarians can better meet patrons' information needs and more wisely prioritize their library's resources. Are web visitors searching on topics you have few resources for? Perhaps it's time to invest some energy in the topic! Are the usage statistics low for a page that takes a lot of staff time to update and maintain? Maybe users can't find the resource or don't care about it. How much does featuring a resource on your homepage increase people's use of it? Once people are aware of a resource, will they continue to use it after it has left your homepage featured resources? The Health Workforce Information Center, an online library of resources related to the health workforce, uses Google Analytics data to ask and answer these questions and more. See how data from Google Analytics can help you improve your website, use resources more efficiently, and better meet the needs of the people who visit your web site.  

Presenter:

Holly Gabriel
Information Specialist, Rural Assistance Center
Grand Forks, ND

Using a "Survivor" style game to teach the finding and application of nursing research articles to unit nurses at a Magnet-designated hospital

The purpose of this project was to introduce the nurses to finding and applying information from research to clinical practice. A game was used as an enticement for nurses to engage in research article review, and comparing unit policies with evidence-based literature.

Standard 13 of ANA's Nursing: Scope & Standards of Practice and the 14 forces of Magnetism guided this project. Games have increased motivation and positively impacted learning outcomes.

The project was conducted in a Magnet-designated hospital. It was designed similarly to the television show "Survivor." After completing a series of reward challenges for prizes, participants had to "vote off" a practice that was not research-based. 

The project leaders were a medical librarian, a Perinatal Research Coordinator, and a Clinical Nurse Specialist. The tribes chose one written nursing practice or policy to compare with the most recent published nursing research. The medical librarian offered instruction on use of the library databases, and article critiques.

One unit challenged a policy used at another hospital in the same system. They decided not to adopt the policy of the corresponding unit. The Mother/Baby unit looked at part of a policy that related to frequency of vital sign monitoring. The evidence was so compelling that they decided to pursue a policy change.

Using a game for teaching nurses to search and apply research findings could make adopting principles of evidence-based practice more appealing. Improving understanding and application of research to practice brings clarity of policy to staff nurses and evidence-based care to patients.

Presenter:

Mary Pat Gage, BSN, RN, MLIS
Wheaton Franciscan Library Services
Milwaukee, WI

Directly Exporting PubMed Citations to EndNote: Browser Settings Are the Key

The export of MEDLINE references to EndNote® can be accomplished in various ways. Unlike Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed does not have a direct export feature to EndNote. Until recently, PubMed references had to be saved as a text file to import into EndNote. Now, the automatic export of PubMed references can be done using either Internet Explorer (IE) or Mozilla Firefox Web browsers.

Various combinations of computer platforms and Internet browsers were tested. For each test, a PubMed search was performed and browser configuration was modified to provide direct exportation of citations to EndNote. Platforms utilized include Microsoft Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows 7, and Macintosh OS X 10.6.1 (Snow Leopard). Browsers tested included Internet Explorer 7 and Internet Explorer 8 for Windows and Mozilla Firefox for Windows and Macintosh.

The Mozilla Firefox configuration, as is, allows Windows and Macintosh users to direct export from PubMed to EndNote. Internet Explorer versions 7 and 8 on Windows platforms can automatically export references from PubMed to EndNote after the IE browser setup is altered.

The seamless export of citations from MEDLINE to EndNote is part of a well-designed knowledge management system, and a value-added service to health professionals. In addition, librarians need to be aware of alternatives to costly services. Using IE's recent enhancements, PubMed is more like interfaces with direct export.

Presenters:

Carole Gall, MLS, AHIP
Gift Officer & Medical Resources Consultant
Indiana University School of Medicine Library
Indianapolis IN

Osman Gurdal, PhD
Director of Education Technology
Indiana University School of Medicine, KIT Department
Indianapolis, IN

Sue London
Electronic Education Coordinator
Ruth Lilly Medical Library
Indianapolis, IN

Rescue of the Stranded Librarian - The Librarian Goes to Medical Residency Orientation

This abstract addresses the sense of isolation and abandonment felt by a new librarian who steps up into a solo librarian position at a regional teaching hospital.  This librarian decides to step forward and join some of the "natives" on her remote island and goes to medical residency orientation. 

The librarian's goals and expectations before the orientation, how they changed during orientation, and evaluation of those expectations after attending orientation are discussed.

Goals and expectations

  • Orientation content and discussions would reveal instructional needs of medical residents.  This information could be used in formulating library instructional content.
  • Learn more about the rules and standards required by the hospital, state of Ohio and the American Osteopathic Association as they apply to the medical resident.
  • "I don't know what to expect" and let the sense of discovery and serendipity occur.
  • Get to know the residents, faculty, and graduate medical education staff and vice versa for the librarian.
  • Learn the physical facilities and existing programs offered at the regional hospital.
  • Learn more about the hospital's culture, expectations of residents, and some of the duties and responsibilities of this group.

This immersion process had a profound, positive effect upon the librarian. All six goals and expectations had positive outcomes. The sense of being stranded and isolated melted into the past.  The librarian begins to feel like this might be "home".

Presenter:

Mary Pat Harnegie, MLIS
Medical Librarian
South Pointe Medical Library
Warrensville Heights, OH

Collaboration in a University Wellness Initiative

Marquette University has undertaken a vital and varied wellness initiative that may provide useful examples for other institutions.  In May 2009 the Wellness Implementation Committee, consisting of twenty-six faculty, staff and administrators, was created to plan and implement wellness programming for Marquette employees.  Guided by the Creating Well Workplaces program of the Wellness Council of America (WELCOA), we set the goal of being designated a Well Workplace and contributing to Milwaukee's efforts to be designated a Well City.  As committee representative for Raynor Memorial Libraries, I have had the opportunity to build new relationships on campus, promote library resources and services, and support health literacy.  I have researched best practices, worked with other committee members and units on campus to plan campus-wide programs and activities, and developed LibGuides for the University Wellness Web site that bring together library resources with consumer-level information. The guides are posted in coordination with committee programming, and are also available on the Libraries' Web site for use by health sciences students as they provide patient care.  In January 2010, Marquette received a Gold Well Workplace Award from WELCOA.  On March 18, 2010, Milwaukee was designated a Well City USA.  In this session I will discuss the development of Marquette's wellness program, how other institutions can work towards a Well Workplace designation, how librarians can contribute to the process, and our continuing health promotion efforts. 

Presenter:

Martha Jermé
Health Sciences Librarian
Marquette University
Milwaukee, WI

Librarians Step Up: The Electronic Medical Record

Allina Hospitals & Clinics was an early adopter of a system wide electronic medical record (EMR), and Allina's librarians are fortunate to be contributors to its success. As team members of the Clinical Decision Support (CDS) unit, we support the ongoing need for order sets containing the best available evidence.

The Allina librarians began work initially performing  patient care searches, even when we reported into Information Services and then Human Resources.  The connection between our work and our reporting departments distanced us from formal participation in health care as we know it today.  In 2010, our library work converges with CDS. Each librarian is also a liaison to at least one clinical service line (CSL). These CSLs represent health conditions or clinical disciplines. Within CSLs our health system strives for excellence in patient care and outcomes, and to improve our patients' experience. Librarians also have ad hoc assignments to "expert group committees" that meet for clarification of content within order sets.  Some CSLs even convene multi-disciplinary support groups, including a librarian, in follow-up to a CSL executive committee meeting.

We are capable team-members whose work funnels into Allina's EMR system. We impact the development of order sets as we provide literature searches in support of the CDS team. Our work, at its best, will ultimately impact excellent care and an excellent patient experience.

Our poster will describe our changing roles up to our current work in support of Allina's EMR, and we will further describe possibilities for any future impact on Allina, a leader in healthcare.

Presenters:

Pamela Barnard, MSLS
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

James Bulger, MLIS
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

Sharon Kambeitz, MLIS, AHIP
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

Anita von Geldern, MLIS
Allina Hospitals & Clinics
Minneapolis, MN

Navigating Collaboration: Connecting for Outreach

Objectives: Successful outreach with community members depends upon several factors. This poster highlights two important considerations for librarians doing outreach in the community: 1. The necessity to maintain an awareness of the levels of interaction and goal sharing inherent in different types of formations; and 2. The readiness of parties to embrace change.

Methods: A review of the literature led to identification of a model of change theory and an understanding of the levels of goal sharing and interaction in different group formations. The authors have created a visual model to demonstrate the overlay of the two philosophies of change management and levels of outreach.

Results: The level of commitment and resource sharing in outreach efforts between libraries and community organizations is tied to both group's level of readiness to embrace and manage change.  

Conclusions: Understanding the formation and interaction framework as well as a community's readiness for change can help librarians select appropriate methods of outreach with identified community partners and effect positive outcomes.

Presenters:

Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, MSLIS
Creighton University
Omaha, NE

Jacqueline Leskovec, MLIS, MA, RN
Outreach and Evaluation Coordinator
National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region
Chicago, IL 60612-4330 

Organizing the archives of the Midwest Chapter:  a collaboration between MC/MLA and the UIC Library of the Health Sciences

The UIC Library of the Health Sciences Special Collections
Dept. serves as the custodian of the archives of the Midwest Chapter of the Medical Library Association. While the MC/MLA archival material has always been open and available to members of the organization, until recently no systematic attempt to provide an intellectual structure to the papers, correspondence and other materials that make up the collection had been undertaken. In 2009, an effort was launched to remedy this situation. The MC/MLA Archives Committee proposed a plan to work cooperatively with the UIC Library of the Health Sciences Special Collections Dept. to organize the material, house it in archival storage containers, and complete a detailed finding aid for users of the collection. This project included the hiring of a recently-graduated librarian with archival processing experience. This poster will describe the details of this process and its final outcome. Photographs of the collection before, during and after the completion of the project will be included.

Presenters:

Mary Hitchcock
Health Sciences Librarian
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Madison, WI

Kevin O'Brien
Assistant Access and Special Collections Librarian
UIC Library of the Health Sciences
Chicago, IL

©opyright: Step Up to New Roles

Objective: Copyright is a complex issue that educational faculty and other members of the university have to confront on a daily basis.  Some individuals on campus may be unfamiliar with or misinformed on copyright, which creates an information need for the campus as a whole.  It also directly affects the curriculum because non-licensed, copyrighted content cannot be posted on the course management system. In order to remedy this need and ensure copyright is being addressed systematically, the Ocasek Medical Library at the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) began working with copyright issues. 

Methods: One of the reference librarians became responsible for addressing copyright issues, and a part-time library science student was hired to assist.  To fill its new role as an intermediary on copyright issues, the library took several steps.  First, the information and links on copyright were updated.  This included educating users on Creative Commons Licenses and the permissions process as well as outlining campus copyright roles.  One of the main concerns at NEOUCOM was the use of images in educational presentations.  This led to auditing images in presentations, verifying citations, finding alternative images, and developing a database for finding permissible images.  For a more general approach, the library created citation guidelines and began giving copyright presentations.  Copyright also became a consideration in the collection-development policy.  The results have been increased awareness of copyright issues as well as increased support of the curriculum.

Presenters:

Rienne Johnson
Reference Librarian
Ocasek Medical Library
Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy
Rootstown, OH

Beth Layton
Director
Ocasek Medical Library
Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy  
Rootstown, OH

Amber Repp
Reference Image Assistant
Ocasek Medical Library
Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy
Rootstown, OH

Benefits of being a member of Wisconsin Library Services (WiLS)

This poster will highlight the benefits of being a member of Wisconsin Library Services (WiLS), a midwestern library network that has been dedicated to advancing libraries for over 30 years. The current membership is diverse, consisting of 67 academic libraries, 20 special libraries, 244 K-12 school libraries and 228 public libraries within 17 public library systems.

The strength of our network is clear in the successes of our most popular programs: cooperative purchasing and resource sharing.

Last year, WiLS managed in excess of 3500 database subscriptions; our members average a 15-20% savings off list pricing. We also offer customized database trials and group subscriptions with no hidden fees.

Recently ranked 4th in lending by the Association of College and Research Libraries, WiLS is one of the largest and fastest ILL groups in the country. We have provided a wide range of expert ILL services to libraries, including acting as the borrowing agent, workflow consulting, and extensive ILLiad training.

Presenter:

Jane Richard
WiLS Member Services Librarian
Madison, WI

Women's Health and Fitness and Taubman Health Sciences Library

This poster will highlight an annual community event sponsored by the University of Michigan Medical School and the role played in it by the Taubman Health Sciences Library.  A group of women medical students organizes Women's Health and Fitness Day every winter. The day is focused on educating the community – women and men of all ages – about various aspects of women's health.  This educational day, free for all participants, provides an opportunity for medical students to interact with and learn from the local community members.  It offers participants a variety of workshops led by University of Michigan experts in the field as well as a chance to network with and meet other people.  The goals of this event include educating the community about the role of health and fitness throughout women's lives, along with specific health-related issues that may be of interest.  The University of Michigan Taubman Health Sciences Library has taken part in four annual events, providing reliable sources of online health information in the past, and, this year, presenting two workshops on how to find such sources.

Presenters:

Bethany R. Harris
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI

Merle Rosenzweig
Liaison and Research Librarian
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI

Anna Ercoli Schnitzer
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI

Advocating for the Hospital Librarian

The roles of hospital-based librarians are evolving to address the challenges brought about by rapid changes in the health care environment coupled with advances in technology.  Communicating to administrators and other institutional stakeholders about these evolving roles is essential to the survival of hospital libraries.

This poster will feature an advocacy toolkit using "Time = Money" as its theme. The main theme will be expanded with five key messages that illustrate the roles that librarians play in improving patient care, enhancing staff effectiveness, providing educational resources, increasing patient satisfaction, and supporting innovation and research. A sample 2' x 3' poster will be the centerpiece for the larger poster and will be accompanied by additional information, including the URL for the downloadable poster and supplemental materials that complete the toolkit.  The content of the poster and accompanying materials is based on previously published work from the MLA Vital Pathways project.

Librarians will be encouraged to download the "Time = Money" poster in PDF format and brand it for use in their respective institutions. The toolkit is intended to be portable and easy to adapt to various settings, including meetings of hospital administrators or health professionals. The advocacy toolkit will be linked to the GMR Website in preparation for National Medical Librarians Month in October, 2010.  

"Time = Money" posters will be raffled at the Midwest Chapter/MLA meeting. Samples of the other materials also will be available at the chapter meeting.

Presenter:

Submitted on behalf of the RAC Advocacy Working Group by:

Denise Rumschlag
Manager of Library Services
St.Vincent Hospital Library
Indianapolis, IN

A Step Forward for Reference Services: Measuring the Impact of Eliminating Traditional Reference Service while Fostering a New Liaison Librarian Model

In December 2009, the Prior Health Sciences Library's (PHSL) public services eliminated traditional reference desk hours offered by librarians and moved to a just-in-time model of reference. The new service, PICS (Personalized Information Consult Service) is primarily an appointment-based liaison model. One librarian was assigned as liaison for each of the five colleges PHSL serves: dentistry, medicine and allied health, nursing, optometry, and public health. Liaisons serving medicine and allied health and nursing also were assigned those groups in the medical center.

The goals of this service are:  to understand customers' information needs in context; to provide specialist reference assistance when and where needed; and to provide increased awareness of librarian and library services across the health sciences by encouraging librarians to be more proactive.  In addition, the new service model was instituted to provide greater flexibility for the small staff of librarians, to provide more time for their projects, and to utilize expertise more effectively and efficiently.

We sought to analyze statistical data gathered from each customer encounter to determine if the new model of service was influencing the number, length, and focus of specialized consultations. We also sought to evaluate whether this more personalized model was increasing librarians' participation in more meaningful types of work with their assigned colleges such as instruction, committee work, and grant inclusion.

Presenters:

Carol Powell, MLS, AHIP
Associate Professor/Instruction Librarian
Prior Health Sciences Library
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

Stephanie J. Schulte, MLIS
Assistant Professor/Education & Reference Services Coordinator
Prior Health Sciences Library
The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

Let the students choose!  Delivering PubMed EBM instruction in a variety of formats.

Objective/Purpose: To improve student EBM searching skills using PubMed by offering a variety of instructional opportunities including drop-in workshops, a library-created tutorial, or NCBI's PubMed tutorials.

Participants: Second-year medical students at a midwestern medical school, completing a required EBM searching assignment.

Program/Methods/Brief description: At the University of Wisconsin – Madison School of Medicine & Public Health, students complete an EBM curriculum during the 4-semester Patient, Doctor, & Society (PDS) course.  As part of this curriculum,  M2 students must create a PICO question and search PubMed for high-quality studies relevant to a patient seen in clinic.  Because searching PubMed for answers to clinical questions is new to many students, faculty encourage them to utilize extra-curricular training opportunities. 

Prior to 2008, students needing assistance with this exercise could either attend an optional workshop led by Ebling librarians or learn PubMed on their own.  However, very few students took advantage of the library sessions, and as a result librarians spent a significant amount time working with students one-on-one. In an effort to provide more focused and convenient training opportunities, in 2008 the library created and offered a virtual assignment-specific tutorial as an additional choice. 

Main results/Conclusion: Data collected over two years indicate that giving students a variety of instructional opportunities has led to better use of training resources and, as a result, better searching skills.  In addition, anecdotal evidence indicates that librarian time devoted to this project has declined.

Presenters:

Christopher Hooper-Lane, MA, AHIP
Clinical Services Team Lead & Informationist
Ebling Library
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Erika L. Sevetson, MS
Medical Education & Public Health Informationist
Ebling Library
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Complementary and alternative medicine

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a facet of health information available to consumers.  CAM therapies can be applied to various conditions, diseases, and ailments, but medical librarians may feel uncomfortable or unqualified providing CAM services for topics like weight control and nutrition due to the taboos of CAM treatments and therapies, and their contrast to Western medicine. 

This poster reviews the literature about the definition of CAM and the problems associated with it, and the ways in which CAM resources for weight control and nutrition have been handled in scholarship.  From this information, suggestions for improving or implementing successful CAM services in the library are addressed.  This poster proposes three strategies for developing CAM services: collaboration, currency, and cultivation of good evaluation skills in patrons.

Presenter:

Katherine Westby
Graduate student
UW-Madison School of Library & Information Studies
Madison, WI

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Study

The NN/LM Greater Midwest Region provides several monetary awards to institutions in the region to fund outreach projects.  The overall goal of the current project is to conduct a study to determine the impact that GMR funding has on the ability of Network members to perform outreach on behalf of the NN/LM.  Electronic surveys will be distributed to the primary investigators of twenty-two GMR-funded outreach projects completed between 2006 and 2009. 

By conducting a content analysis of the final reports submitted by the primary investigators of each outreach project and by surveying all of the Principle Investigators, the Outreach Impact

Study will address the following questions: What did the institutions accomplish with the NN/LM funding?  What outcomes did the institutions report from their NN/LM-funded outreach projects?  What changes have been made in their institutional programs as a result of the funding they received?  What lessons did the institutions learn through implementation of their NN/LM funded projects?  What changes would the institutions recommend to the NN/LM about their funding programs?

Our poster will describe our identification of need and target population, project objectives, and the methodology we will be using to conduct our outreach impact study.

Presenter:

Zach Young, MLS
Senior Library Technician
University of Kentucky Medical Center Library