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Midwest Chapter MLA

Papers - Sunday, October 9th


Session

 

Contributed Papers

Presenters

Time

Room

1

The QR Code:  What is it?  How do I use it in my library?

Richard E. Humphrey

11-11.50am

Texas

1

From Citation Management to Knowledge Management:  Developing and Implementing Innovative EndNote Training and Support Services on the Health Sciences Campus

John Chenault

11-11.50am

Texas

1

Teaming Up with Nursing to put Evidence into Action at an Academic Medical Center

Stephanie J. Schulte

11-11.50am

Michigan

1

Take the Ball and Run with it: Seizing an Opportunity to Embed EBM into an Internal Medicine Clerkship

Stephanie J. Schulte & Carol A. Powell

11-11.50am

Michigan

1

Building a Team of Collaborators in Mental Health

Rienne Johnson

11-11.50am

Illinois

1

InformedCaring.org: Your Portal to Information Resources for Health Professionals

Mandy Meloy, MA, MLIS

11-11.50am

Illinois

1

Speaker Ready Room

 

11-11.50am

Florida

2

Knocking it out of the Park for Cancer Symptom Support:  Lessons Learned in the Development and Evaluation of a Cancer Patient Self-Management System

Katherine Schilling, Ed.D.

3-3.50pm

Texas

2

On the Research Ethics Team:  Embedded, In-depth Reference Services

Jere Odell, MA, MLS

3-3.50pm

Texas

2

Managing Journals by Committee

Sharon Purtee & Edith Starbuck

3-3.50pm

Michigan

2

Video Journals to Increase Productivity in Medical Research and Education

Moshe Pritsker, Ph.D.

3-3.50pm

Michigan

2

Simulations, Outreach and Health Sciences Libraries:  A Triple Play for Success

Jennifer DeBerg,  OT, MLS, Linda Walton, Chris Childs

3-3.50pm

Illinois

2

MedPOWER:  Teaming up to Make a Difference

Shannon Johnson, MLS & Mary K. Ross, MSW

3-3.50pm

Illinois

2

Speaker Ready Room

 

3-3.50pm

Florida

3

Librarian Leadership in Improving Safety in Health Care: A Review of the Literature

Holly Ann Burt

4-4.50pm

Texas

3

Moving Forward by Retreating:  Using Annual Staff Retreats to Foster Team Building During Times of Significant Changes in Libraries

Elizabeth M. Smigielski & Neal D. Nixon

4-4.50pm

Texas

3

Overcoming Solo Librarian Blues:  Partner

Monica Corcoran, MLIS & Gail A. Lee, MLS

4-4.50pm

Michigan

3

Wireless Outreach:  No Strings Attached

Laura Davison & Mary Congleton

4-4.50pm

Michigan

3

Instant Access - Using Technology to Bridge the Access Gap at the Library

Carol Shannon, MPH

4-4.50pm

Illinois

3

“We built it ourselves … from scratch” ---How to Grow an Idea into a Mobile App

Nadia Lalla, MLIS & Stephen Flynn, MSI

4-4.50pm

Illinois

3

Healthcare Academy for Middle School Pupil’s Success—Tomorrow’s Health Care Professional

Margaret L. Moutseous

4-4.50pm

Florida

3

Trauma Rounds and Clinical Librarianship in a Hospital Setting

Margaret L. Moutseous

4-4.50pm

Florida

The QR Code:  What is it?  How do I use it in my library? 
Texas, 11:00am-11:50am
Presenter:
  Richard E. Humphrey, Reference Librarian, Ruth Lilly Law Library, Indianapolis, Indiana
Authors

The QR Code is a two-dimensional type of specific matrix barcode which can be read by a smartphone or a dedicated QR barcode reader.  Our presentation will define the QR Code, how it is used in the Ruth Lilly Law Library by patrons with smartphones, and about possible future QR applications in our law library and other types of libraries.  In this session, we will emphasize and demonstrate how easily librarians can implement this technology, for little or no cost, and how they can start setting up and using QR applications when they get back to their own institutions.

From Citation Management to Knowledge Management: Developing and Implementing Innovative Endnote Training and Support Services on the Health Sciences Campus
Texas, 11:00am-11:50am
Presenter and Author:  John Chenault, Assistant Professor, Reference Department, Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky

EndNote is a software tool for publishing and managing bibliographies on the Windows and Apple desktop platforms. The EndNote program also includes EndNote Web, a cloud-based resource that enables users to access their EndNote libraries from any computer, and that provides an online resource and environment designed for networking and collaboration. Medical librarians at the Kornhauser Health Sciences Library (KHSL) offer faculty, clinicians, researchers, and students monthly introductory EndNote workshops, provide individualized training and technical support across campus via EndNote HouseCalls, furnish technical assistance in the creation and organization of specialized research libraries, and deliver patron-requested literature search results in customized EndNote Libraries via email. This paper focuses on the design and implementation of KHSL's EndNote training program and special services. It discusses how to organize and implement an EndNote training regime to generate excitement about library services, increase on and off-campus use of library resources, serve as a feeder to other library courses, and reaffirm the central role of the library as a learning resource that supports the bibliographic and knowledge management needs of the diverse academic communities we serve.

Teaming Up with Nursing to Put Evidence into Action at an Academic Medical Center
Michigan, 11:00am-11:50am
Presenter:  Stephanie J. Schulte, Assistant Professor, Education & Reference Services Coordinator, OSU Health Sciences Library, Columbus, Ohio
Authors

Evidence in Action (EIA) Rounds is a clinical nursing initiative at The Ohio State University Health System that provides unit-based interactive forums to assist nurses in exploring best practices in the management of a selected patient. Facilitators of EIA Rounds include two health system nurse leaders in evidence based practice (EBP) and a nursing liaison librarian. Facilitators team up with unit nurses caring for the patient to define evidence-based practice, use an evidence-based approach to answer clinical questions, and explore the best available evidence related to a specific patient. Using nursing sensitive indicators and the Iowa Model of Evidence Based Practice as a guide, the facilitators review details of the case and note clinical questions from the care team, search appropriate internal and external resources for evidence, and return to discuss their findings. The evidence, or lack thereof, is placed in the context of the selected patient. Gaps in policies and procedures and evidence from the research literature are all discussed in a non-punitive manner. If gaps are identified, the EBP nurse leader facilitators have the authority and means to revise policies or create new policies if needed. This presentation will explore the librarian’s role in this unique collaboration aimed at putting best practices into action. It will also discuss the outcomes and challenges encountered in the process. 

Take the Ball and Run with it:  Seizing an Opportunity to Embed EBM into an Internal Medicine Clerkship
Michigan, 11:00am-11:50am
Co-Presenters and Authors:  Stephanie J. Schulte, Assistant Professor, Education & Reference Services Coordinator, OSU Health Sciences Library and Carol A. Powell, Associate Professor, Instruction Librarian, Prior Health Sciences Library and Center for Knowledge Management, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

How can librarians become embedded in a meaningful way within an existing medical school curriculum? Our presentation will describe how we seized an opportunity to present evidence based medicine principles and applications during student morning report sessions held during the internal medicine clerkship rotations in the third year of medical school. We will discuss the librarian’s role and the logistics of interactions with students before and during the session. We will also share lessons learned and student evaluation feedback. Additionally, we will discuss larger outcomes related to permanent inclusion of librarians and evidence based inquiry into a forthcoming revised medical school curriculum. Our experience will shed light on how both purposeful and serendipitous interactions with medical educators at high levels led to this level of significant inclusion.

Building a Team of Collaborators in Mental Health
Illinois, 11:00am-11:50am
Presenter: Rienne Johnson, Reference Librarian, Oliver Ocasek Regional Medical Information Center, Northeast Ohio Medical University,  Rootstown, Ohio
Authors

  • Rienne E.  Johnson, MLIS, Oliver Ocasek Regional Medical Information Center, Northeast Ohio Medical University
  • Heather A. McEwen, MS, MLIS, Oliver Ocasek Regional Medical Information Center, Northeast Ohio Medical University
  • Beth A. Layton, MLS, MBA, AHIP, Oliver Ocasek Regional Medical Information Center, Northeast Ohio Medical University
  • Vicki L. Montesano, Ph.D., PCC-S, LICDC. , Northeast Ohio Medical University

Background:   The library is one of three institutional entities involved with an academic institution’s mission to promote recovery and improve the lives of people with severe mental illness. With these departments, the library is working on research and outreach projects as a part of a programmatic approach to health care delivery. 
Methods:  Four projects have been completed in the past academic year. The library and a center focusing on best practices in mental health completed an externally funded needs assessment of the mental health information needs of local clergy. The library director is a member of the steering committee for a symposium on integrated mental health, coordinated through a departmental external grant. During the symposium, librarians gave an invited presentation on mental health information resources for practitioners and consumers. Resource guides were prepared for the conference and are now virtually accessible to practitioners and consumers not affiliated with the institution.
Results:  The needs assessment delivered data that will inform the strategy for clergy information outreach. More importantly, the project and the director’s attendance at steering committee meetings necessitated repeated high level interaction and encourage further collaboration. The guides have been widely publicized by center staff.
Conclusions:  New collaborative projects continue to be developed. An information session for clergy may be the next project. As a result of these projects, librarians demonstrate the role they play as partners in health care delivery.

InformedCaring.org:  Your Portal to Information Resources for Health Professionals
Illinois, 11:00am-11:50am
Presenter and Author:
  Mandy Meloy, MA, MLIS, Student Programs Coordinator, Wisconsin AHEC (Area Health Education Center) Statewide Program Office, UW-Madison, Madison, WI

InformedCaring.org is a statewide project designed to serve those working in local health departments, federally qualified community health centers, and others providing health services in rural and underserved communities in Wisconsin -- particularly those without access to academic or hospital libraries. Although the site has been designed with these groups in mind, it is not password protected and is available to all.
In 2005, Northern Wisconsin AHEC (Area Health Education Center) received a grant to build the original InformedCaring.org, which included subscription databases to evidence-based practice resources. With the end of funding, InformedCaring.org was unable to sustain the subscription databases. The site needed reworking to take advantage of more publicly-available resources.
With assistance from partners and funding sources, Wisconsin AHEC Statewide staff undertook a redesign of the site. To meet the needs of our audience and expand the content of InformedCaring.org, we conducted a needs assessment and used Healthiest Wisconsin 2020 state health plan as a guide. Using marketing and outreach efforts, we debuted it February 2011.
As of September 1, we have reached over 300 people via in-person training and have our presentation available for Wisconsin Department of Public Health and local health department employees on the Wisconsin TRAIN website (https://wi.train.org/DesktopShell.aspx). As of April 2011, InformedCaring.org has had over 29,500 website visits and 71,000 page visits.
This paper will discuss the process in which InformedCaring.org is “taking it to the next level” by working with partners, providing access, and gaining feedback to best meet the needs of our audience.

Knocking it Out of the Park for Cancer Symptom Support:  Lessons Learned in the Development and Evaluation of a Cancer Patient Self-Management System
Texas, 3:00pm-3:50pm
Presenter:  Katherine Schilling, Ed.D.  Associate Professor of Library and Information Science,
Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana
Authors

  • Katherine Schilling, Ed.D.  Associate Professor of Library and Information Science,
  • Indiana University
  • Christine M. Newlon, Indiana University School of Informatics
  • Kimberly Wagler-Ziner, Assistant Scientist, Center for Research and Scholarship, IU School of Nursing and Behavioral Research Recruitment Core Coordinator, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center
  • Robert Skipworth Comer, Indiana University School of Informatics
  • Anna M. McDaniel, PhD., Indiana University School of Informatics and Indiana University School of Nursing

Background:  The patient symptom monitoring and management system (SMMS) is a secure web portal through which cancer patients’ symptoms are recorded and tracked.  It incorporates ongoing assessment of patients’ symptoms, tailored information delivery, and automated symptom messaging to oncology nurses.  This presentation describes issues and challenges in developing and evaluating the SMMS.  Portal design, usability, security, and pilot testing with patients and healthcare providers will be discussed, and results of evaluation activities will be described.
Methods:  The patient-driven SMMS was developed at a major oncology center, then piloted with newly-diagnosed colon cancer patients (n = 12).  Each week, over a period of eight weeks, patients recorded their cancer-related symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, numbness, pain, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and others (N = 103).  Symptom severity was ranked on a 0 (not a problem) to 10 (interfered heavily with my lifestyle) scale (M = 4).  Based on each week’s symptoms and related health management questions, the SMMS generated an evidence-based information Toolkit tailored to each patient’s symptoms and concerns.
Results and Discussion:  Development and evaluation activities are discussed, including web mining to identify patterns in testers’ symptoms and information behaviors.  Individual-level and system-level data collected through portal activity logs included login time, time on-page, reported symptoms, and information resources used in support of symptom self-management.  Data analysis has helped troubleshoot design and system interaction problems.  Research findings are also used to improve the SMMS’s functionality, promoting more effective cancer symptom self-management support for patients.

On the Research Ethics Team:  Embedded, In-Depth Reference Services
Texas, 3:00pm-3:50pm
Presenter and Author:  Jere Odell, MA, MLS, Academic Literature Specialist, Indiana University Center for Bioethics, Indianapolis, Indiana

New developments in the life sciences place researchers, human subjects and ethics committees in unfamiliar territory. While the investigator is eager to develop better approaches to medical care and subjects often want to participate, IRBs may seem overly cautious. To address these issues, while facilitating the process of protocol development and IRB review, the Translational Research Ethics Consultation (T-REX) team provides point-of-need ethics and information consultations to Indiana researchers. The T-REX team includes a bioethics librarian who supports consultations with quick, in-depth reference services. For a librarian, this service is both rewarding and demanding. One must be prepared to develop a basic understanding of the science while also searching for relevant resources in the legal, regulatory, and ethics literatures. Although short deadlines for complex reviews lead to some intense workdays, the results contribute to better medical research outcomes for all involved. Using a consultation regarding the ethics of healthy sibling bone marrow donors in pediatric research, this paper provides a case study of how librarians can serve interdisciplinary, research and service teams.

Managing Journals by Committee
Michigan, 3:00pm-3:50pm
Presenters and Authors:   Sharon Purtee, Technical Services Librarian, Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, University of Cincinnati and Edith Starbuck, Information Services Librarian, Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, University of Cincinnati

What do you do when your serials librarian retires and there’s no option to hire a replacement?  You form a committee.  When the University of Cincinnati Health Sciences serials librarian retired in early 2010, budget cuts required that the position be eliminated from the personnel lines.  While other aspects of her position could be redistributed, rather than reassign another librarian to manage the collection development tasks, the library director decided to platoon the responsibilities for serials selection, faculty contact, subscription termination, and all other tasks relative to serials collection maintenance. With varying knowledge of journal management, the group of four (the director, two information services librarians and a technical services librarian) worked as a team over the first season of journal cancellations, continued format switches, and new acquisitions. 
We hit a few home runs, struck out few times, put in long hours at the monitor and in the team room reviewing the tapes and the old play book trying to come up with the new game plan for the next year’s subscriptions.  We systematically addressed new requests, budget impact, and clinical versus research requests and current holdings in the library to come up with a strategy that would put us in the winner’s column in the eye’s of the faculty and students. 
This paper will describe the myriad challenges and lessons learned plus our successes and a few missteps along the way during the first year of managing the UC Health Sciences Library journal collection by committee.

Video Journals to Increase Productivity in Medical Research and Education
Michigan, 3:00pm-3:50pm
Presenter and Author:  Moshe Pritsker, Ph.D., CEO, co-founder, Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE), www.jove.com, Somerville, Massachusetts

Medical sciences chronically suffer from the low reproducibility of clinical and experimental studies since the traditional text format of STM journals cannot provide an adequate description of details and nuances of complex technical procedures. This creates a critical “bottleneck” problem of knowledge transfer for research and education. Addressing this challenge, a new generation of science journals employs video online to provide a systematic visualized publication of experimental studies. Visualization through video greatly facilitates the understanding and learning of experimental procedures enhancing knowledge transfer and productivity in research and education. However, video-based publication in the rigorous academic format requires a completely new set of concepts and technical approaches to production, publication and dissemination processes. Academic librarians have a critical role in the development and adoption of science video publication. Based on my experience as a publisher of Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE), the first video journal for biological and medical sciences indexed in MEDLINE and PubMed, I will provide an overview of the growing field of video publication and discuss its technical challenges, implications for scholarly communication and acceptance in the academic and library community.

Simulations, Outreach and Health Sciences Libraries:   A Triple Play for Success
Illinois, 3:00pm-3:50pm
Presenters:  Jennifer DeBerg,  OT, MLS, Health Sciences Clinical Education Librarian, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, Linda Walton, Associate University Librarian & Director, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences & Branch Libraries, and Chris Childs, Health Sciences Education and Outreach Librarian, Health Sciences Clinical Education Librarian, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa
Authors 

PURPOSE: Our library staff has been partnering with faculty to develop curricula using simulation equipment for various outreach programs to youth in the state.  The simulation center is housed and managed by our library.  This presentation will recount the development and expansion of this two-year old program and describe its various components. The programs are aimed at grades 5-12 to stimulate interest in science and health care professions through engagement and participation in a variety of interactive educational sessions using simulation equipment, such as eye exams, neurological/cognitive assessments, and cardiac rhythm evaluation.
METHODS: The focus of the paper will be on the description of the library’s curriculum, including descriptions of the various activity stations for participants, the use of simulation equipment by the students, and the value of staff expertise to provide the participants with a sense of what it is like to be a health sciences student or practitioner. Additionally, the presentation will provide background on the history of our library’s simulation center.
RESULTS: The paper will provide data about the various programs, discussion on the amount of staff commitment required to be successful, as well as present other challenges and solutions for improving the curriculum, including plans for the future development of this program.
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the paper will discuss the simulation center’s contribution to the overall mini medical school curriculum, and how it has expanded to other health sciences pipeline recruitment initiatives with an emphasis on underrepresented minorities. 

MedPOWER:  Teaming Up to Make a Difference
Illinois, 3:00pm-3:50pm

Co-Presenters and Authors:  Shannon Johnson, MLS, Information and Instruction Librarian to the College of Health and Human Services, Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, Indiana and Mary K. Ross, MSW, NEI-AHEC Director, College of Health and Human Services, Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne

TASK: To encourage minority and disadvantaged youth in Northeast Indiana to pursue careers in medicine and dentistry, so these future health care professionals may consider practicing in urban underserved and rural communities upon graduation - helping to reduce health disparities.
Solution: Med-POWER (Medical – Dental Providing Opportunities With Education and Research) an intensive four-week summer enrichment program for health care goal-oriented college students, designed to 1) expose participants to careers in medicine and dentistry, 2) give students direct hands on training in developing literature reviews on specific research proposals addressing health disparities in their communities, 3) health disparities education regarding class, race, poverty, rural and farm health, and behavioral health care needs, and 4) job shadowing in urban underserved and rural health care centers for the purpose of developing competitive applicants for dental and medical schools.
The MedPOWER Program was developed by the Northeast Indiana Area Heath Education Center, with a mission “To improve the supply, demand and distribution of quality health care professionals and support personnel through collaborative community and academic partnerships.”  Partnership with the local academic community and the IPFW Helmke Library has become an integral part of the program, helping students strive to increase critical thinking skills, increase their ability to evaluate information, locate evidence, and synthesis material.  This paper will discuss the history and development of the MedPOWER Program and the role of the library in the partnership, highlighting the team approach the organizers used to reach the students and give a brief overview of participant outcomes.

Librarian Leadership in Improving Safety in Health Care:  A Review of the Literature
Texas, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Presenter and Author:  Holly Ann Burt, Outreach and Exhibits Coordinator, NN/LM GMR, Chicago, Illinois

As part of the larger project of updating a course on patient safety, I performed a comprehensive review of the literature to understand how various library services impact patient safety related issues.  Articles exemplifying the value of libraries in addressing patient safety in the health care setting were highlighted for the course and included in a recent MLA BibKit.  In the process, the diversity of avenues librarians use to meet the needs of their community and, in serving their patrons, help reduce medical error was revealed.  
This paper uses selected articles to highlight different methods that have been proven effective in impacting patient safety.  Each offers an opportunity to increase the visibility and value of the library in the hospital setting.  These methods include:

Librarians are indeed a part of the solution to the problem of patient safety in a rich variety of ways.

Moving Forward by Retreating:  Using Annual Staff Retreats to Foster Team Building During Ties of Significant Change in Libraries
Texas, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Co-Presenters and Authors:  Elizabeth M. Smigielski, Assistant Director, Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, and Neal D. Nixon, Director, Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky

Since 2007, the administration of Kornhauser Health Sciences Library has held employee retreats to address the fear and uncertainty caused by a shifting work environment.  Recent changes include:  the merger of circulation and reference desks; implementation of a clinical librarianship program and a reduction of traditional reference service; cessation of print journal purchases; reorganization of technical services workflow;  and continuing budget and personnel reductions.  These retreats focus on improving communication, collegiality, interpersonal relationships, and responses to stress.  Despite a limited budget, outside facilitators are hired to conduct the retreats.  They are debriefed on the characteristics of the employees and the organizational culture.  They are encouraged to use a combination of small group, interactive and creative activities, as well as self-reflexive techniques such as personality inventories and, goal setting.  Action items and follow-up tasks are encouraged.  These retreats are an effort to recognize and respond to apprehension by providing professional guidance and tools to contend with change and to foster a more collegial, close-knit culture.  These retreats are also a break from routine and an opportunity to further professional and personal development. Assessment data, which will be presented, indicate an overwhelming positive effect with long-term value to employees.

Overcoming Solo Librarian Blues:  Partner
Michigan, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Co-Presenters and Authors:  Monica Corcoran, MLIS,  Medical Librarian, Deaconess Hospital and Gail A. Lee, MLS, Librarian, Southwestern Healthcare, Inc, Evansville, Indiana

Solo librarians in smaller communities, without consortial partnerships, encounter special challenges to networking within the field. Our respective institutions have good resources available to staff. Still, we both have serious shortfalls in our ability to consistently provide excellent service to our constituents. One of us has difficulty accessing current journals. Both have unreasonable expectations regarding volume and range of services. Filling requests can be overwhelming at times.
Our solution: network and volunteer for each other both on and off the clock. Treat each other as patron and colleague – and lightly train / educate each other in our respective specialty areas. We discovered that our abilities and talents dovetail nicely. We are working with each other on improving document delivery and in accessing materials (especially electronic resources). We plan to expand into other areas for further collaboration, including patron outreach and education, and incorporating the use of mobile applications. There is no institutional agreement between our employers and neither institution has significantly increased expenditures to accommodate / support this endeavor.
Written by two solo medical librarians, this paper addresses the challenge of our situation, and presents the solution we are developing in an effort to overcome some of these limitations. This paper outlines the steps taken, and how we plan to build on this model. Our solution is not a new one; rather it’s a modern application of a time-honored collaborative tool. Our experience might spark in others the reminder that we can apply this model to 21st century problems.

Wireless Outreach:   No Strings Attached
Michigan, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Co-Presenters and Authors:  Laura Davison, Asst Director, Access Delivery & Outreach, Medical Center Library, University of Kentucky, and Mary Congleton, Southern KY AHEC Librarian, Medical Center Library, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky

Providing outreach in rural areas (and sometimes urban areas as well) can be challenging.  We consistently face issues of internet access, computer lab availability, and finances.  Using GMR NN/LM outreach funds, we purchased a wireless mobile router, a cellular modem, and iPads to help overcome some of these issues.  With this equipment, we are creating hands-on opportunities for exhibit visitors and a mini-mobile lab for training sessions, to be used in promoting NLM online resources and other outreach services.  It allows us to bring our own “mobile hotspot” with us on our travels as we work toward our goal of providing true mobility and hands-on opportunities in all our outreach offerings.  This presentation will discuss the pitfalls and successes we have experienced thus far, as well as plans for improvement and future uses.  Although challenges will continue, such as lack of cell phone service in rural areas, the mobile aspect provided by the new technologies allows us more options in providing hands-on outreach services.  

Instant Access—Using Technology to Bridge the Access Gap at the Library
Illinois, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Presenter:  Carol Shannon, MPH, Information Services Specialist, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Authors

The Taubman Health Sciences Library (University of Michigan) serves five professional health sciences schools and a large academic medical center.  We partner with these schools to deliver distance learning programs and provide information and instruction about our resources, services, and events.  We have created a variety of online videos using screencasting and video editing software.  These videos include the use of Second Life in public health practice, how to use the University Library’s open link resolver, how to effectively search subject databases, citation analysis, and instructional consumer health videos.  We use different formats and try to reach different audiences, from the university to the general public.  Since mobile technologies are quickly adopted by health sciences professionals and students, we have also adapted our videos to display on handheld devices as well as personal computers.
Our videos are available on YouTube, embedded in LibGuides, and appear on our website and the University Library website.  After three years, we have become proficient at the mechanics of video production and have developed best practices to optimize the viewing experience.   We collect and analyze usage statistics and now have a formal assessment process for evaluating this method of instruction delivery.
This paper discusses our experiences and current practices for efficient online video production.

“We built it ourselves … from scratch” ---How to Grow an Idea into a Mobile App
Illinois, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Co-Presenters:  Nadia Lalla, MLIS, Coordinator of Collections & Information Services, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan and Stephen Flynn, MSI, Emerging Technologies Librarian, College of Wooster Libraries, Wooster, Ohio
Authors

Last year, the Taubman Health Sciences Library (University of Michigan) won the Jean Sayre Innovation Award for the Plain Language Medical Dictionary Widget.  The widget translates common medical terms into plain language using definitions that were created by the federal Department of Health and Human Services.   We decided to take the widget to the next logical step:  we would build a mobile app for iPhones and android devices.  We had no prior experience with building an app, nor did anyone else we knew.
It took nearly six months, but our Plain Language Medical Dictionary app is now available on iTunes.   We are currently creating an Android version.  Future plans include Spanish and Chinese language versions.
This paper will discuss the creative process of developing the app, the technical and institutional hurdles to successful deployment, the challenges of creating intellectual property in an academic environment, and lessons learned.

Healthcare Academy for Middle School Pupil’s Success—Tomorrow’s Health Care Professional
Florida, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Presenter and Author:   Margaret L. Moutseous, Manager, Library Services, St. Mary’s Hospital, Evansville, Indiana

HCAMPS (HealthCare Academy for Middle school Pupils’ Success) is a week long day camp for 6th and 7th graders where various health care career opportunities were explored along with their educational requirements, and participants were required to develop a personal wellness plan.
The first camp began in the first week of June 2009.  The application process included:  submitting a completed application form, a school photo, one page essay, and have letters of recommendation.  A five member team interviewed all applicants.
At the beginning of the HCAMPS – students obtained hospital badges and white lab coats.  Lab coats and badges were distributed on the first day to help participants in learning about professional life. 
During HCAMPS the students participated in the following activities:  A tour of the NICU with hands-on activities, a tour of the ER and the Lifeflight helicopter area, a tour of the simulation lab and participated in Code Blue exercises, the students observed a cow heart dissection by a cardiovascular surgeon, listened to various lectures by various health care professionals, and participated in a day long health screening program.  One day was spent touring various college campuses to learn about educational requirements.  At the end of the week there was a graduation ceremony where all participants gave a brief presentation. 
Why would a library take on such a task as coordinating this kind of effort?  Because it’s a fun project to do,  provides a high profile for the library staff, and recruiting tomorrow’s health care professional is important.

Trauma Rounds and Clinical Librarianship in a Hospital Setting
Florida, 4:00pm-4:50pm
Presenter and Author:   Margaret L. Moutseous, Manager, Library Services, St. Mary’s Hospital, Evansville, Indiana

St. Mary’s is a level II trauma center providing trauma care for a 350 mile radius.  All trauma victims are brought to St. Mary’s and treated or transferred to a level I trauma center if needed.
The Trauma accreditation process began five years ago – and the library staff played a key role in providing necessary materials for the accreditation process.
Trauma rounds began three years ago with the trauma surgeons, nurses, allied health professionals, pharmacists, chaplains and the trauma clinical librarian (TCL) attending the meeting at 7 am on Thursday in the Dave Howard Conference Room.
Many clinical research questions are raised during trauma rounds.  And after rounds the TCL provides the literature to the key physicians and other personal.  All of the research questions are challenging and can take anywhere from an hour to 4+ hours to gather the literature.
The journal collection was changed in order to provide for more trauma literature.  In the trauma video that was made for marketing purposes the TCL is also included as a participant.
The TCL program provides a great partnership between the Trauma Service Line and the Library.