Joint Meeting of the Midwest and Midcontinental Chapters of MLA
Joint Meeting of the Midwest Chapter and the Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association

Two MLA chapters. Sixteen states. One spectacular meeting.
Friday, October 21, 2016 through Monday, October 24, 2016
Des Moines Marriott, 700 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa

Paper Presentations

Papers are listed below in Chronological Order.


Reddit Community Finds Health Answers From Reference Collaborative?

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Cedar Rapds

Time: 1:05:00 PM

Dana Abbey, Health Information Literacy Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region, 12950 E. Montview Blvd., Rm. 3101F, Aurora, CO, 80045

Additional Contributors:

John Bramble, Utah/Technology Coordinator, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah, 10 North 1900 East, Bldg 589, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5890, (801) 585-5743,  john.bramble@utah.edu; Betsy Kelly, Assessment and Evaluation Coordinator, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8132, 660 South Euclid, St. Louis, MO, 63110, (314) 362-2783, betsy.kelly@wustl.edu; Barbara Jones, Missouri/Advocacy Coordinator, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri – Columbia, 1 Hospital Drive Room HSL 145, Columbia, MO, 65212, (573) 884-5042, jonesbarb@health.missouri.edu; Jim Honour, Wyoming/Member Services Coordinator, University of Wyoming Libraries, Dept. 3334, 1000 E. University Ave, Laramie, WY, 82071,(307) 766-6537, jhonour@uwyo.edu; Monica Rogers, MLIS, Division Head, Reference and User Support Services, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, MSC09 5100, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM, 87131-0001, 505-272-0639, Mrogers3@salud.unm.edu

INTRODUCTION: Reddit is an aggregate linking website that has gained in worldwide popularity due to its timeliness, interactivity and participatory nature. On any given day Reddit has nearly 5 million page views, with over 1.3 million unique visitors.  There are a myriad of topics discussed on Reddit, and to help users locate areas of interest entries are posted to “subreddits.” Anyone with an account can post links to content (e.g., websites, images, videos) or submit text content to start a discussion or ask a question. There are numerous health-related subreddits, with many making the list of Reddit’s most popular subreddits. OBJECTIVE: To determine if Reddit would serve as a viable platform for sharing authoritative health information resources and to learn if the information was useful. METHODS: 26 health-related subreddits were identified, and staff self-selected which ones they would monitor and submit responses. The responses provided links to authoritative, free information addressing their question(s). We measured success by whether the submission was judged “useful,” either by the original poster, or other Reddit users. Useful was defined as having at least one upvote over a three-week period from the initial submission. Reddit submissions are scored by readers: upvotes minus any downvotes. Individual subscribers to the 26 subreddits ranged from 347 to nearly 8 million, and there seemed to be no correlation between the size of the subreddits community and the range of up or downvotes. Statistics were kept on actual submissions and did not include questions that staff attempted to answer but did not have appropriate resources to do so. RESULTS: To Be Determined.


Cracking the Health Care Code: Health Literacy in the Upper Midwest

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Cedar Rapids

Time: 1:25:00 PM

Caitlin Bakker, Research Services Librarian, University of Minnesota, 505 Essex Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455

Additional Contributors:

Jonathan Koffel, Clinical Information Librarian, University of Minnesota, 612-626-5454, jbkoffel@umn.edu; Nicole Theis-Mahon, Collections Coordinator and Liaison to the School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota,612-625-5410, theis025@umn.edu

Objectives: Health literacy, the ability to obtain, process and understand basic health information, is a major determinant of an individual’s overall health and health care utilization.  In this project, we aimed to benchmark the health literacy (including numeracy and graph literacy) and examine predictors of literacy levels among an adult population in the Midwest. Methods: The research was conducted at the Minnesota State Fair. Three previously validated were used to assess health literacy: Newest Vital Sign, the General Health Numeracy Test, and the Graph Literacy Scale. Age, educational attainment, zip code, and other potential predictors/modifiers were collected. The results were summarized and inferential statistics used to examine predictors of health literacy levels as well as associations between different types of health literacy. Results: 353 Midwest residents completed the survey, with the majority being white, college-educated and coming from a metropolitan area.  The mean overall score was 72% with significant differences in score based on gender (favoring women) and educational attainment (favoring higher educational attainment). Scores on the NVS were highest (84%) followed by the GLS (71%) and GHNT-6 (62%). Conclusion: Advanced health literacy skills, including the ability to calculate and compare information, were problematic even in well-educated populations. Understanding numerical and graphical information was found to be particularly difficult and more research is needed to understand these deficits and how best to address them. Librarians can provide a solution by working with medical educators and providers to understand the challenges the general public encounters when comprehending health information.


MS Buddy: Utah Multiple Sclerosis Patients Converge through an Innovative iPad Service

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Cedar Rapids

Time: 1:45:00 PM

Erica Lake, Associate Librarian, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, 10 N 1900 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105

Additional Contributors:

Casey Cox, Tooele City Public Library; Tooele, UT; caseyc@TooeleCity.org; Katie Larsen, Tooele City Public Library; Tooele, UT; katiel@TooeleCity.org; Liesl Seborg, Senior Librarian, Adult Outreach and Programming, Salt Lake County Library Services, Salt Lake City, UT, lseborg@SLCoLibrary.org

Objectives: MS patients often face long stretches between doctor visits, and many information needs occur during that interim.  An abundance of MS information and support is available online, however many people living with the disease in rural and urban areas of Utah do not have access to a computer or internet service, or do not have sufficient technology skills. Others lack confidence in their ability to identify trustworthy information. A team of medical and public librarians developed a personalized iPad lending service to connect individuals physically and socially isolated by MS to information and support.  Methods: The MS Buddy service loans iPads to participants to help them learn more about their disease through vetted online content and resources. Librarians provide individual training on using the tablet, and preload personalized content for each participant based on their geographical location. This includes links for their doctor, health care facility, local public library, regional health library, and MS chapter. Results: Initial evaluations have been excellent, with participants gaining the skills and confidence needed to use the technologies, and gaining additional support connections. A detailed toolkit was created so that other librarians and health care providers can implement a similar project in their communities. Conclusions: Many patients today want “high tech” health care services with “high touch” interactions, and librarians are in a unique position to bridge these wants through services that are personalized to individual patient preferences and needs.


Library Materials Found to Benefit Persons with Dementia

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Cedar Rapids

Time: 2:05:00 PM

Mary Beth Riedner, Chair, Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias Interest Group, ASCLA/ALA, 488 Berwick Ct., Schaumburg, IL, 60103

Additional Contributors:

Dr. Susan B. Wesner, Assistant Professor, Chair, Professional Studies, Judson University, Elgin IL, (847) 628-1544, susan.wesner@judsonu.edu

Recognizing the need for libraries to prepare for the exponentially increasing number of persons living with dementia in their communities, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/Greater Midwest Region funded a 2016 Target Project Award entitled “Tales and Travel: Developing Community Partnerships to Expand Library Services”. The award winning Tales & Travel program was developed at the Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin, IL to provide outreach services to adults with early to middle stages of dementia.  It has been implemented at 11 memory care facilities located in Elgin. The program encourages oral reading, browsing through highly illustrated books, and conversation through imaginary trips to locations across the globe. The Target Project studied whether the program: 1) engages and improves the cognitive and social interactions of individuals with dementia; 2) positively impacts the relationship between caregivers and individuals with dementia; 3) expands the library’s outreach to an underserved population; and 4) decreases the stigma and stereotypes of adults with dementia by demonstrating elements of cognition that remain throughout the course of the disease.  Evidence was gathered through qualitative measures using questionnaires completed by formal caregivers and volunteers.  Preliminary results showed increased social and cognitive interactions from participants and improved relationships with caregivers.  The final results of the study will be released for the first time to conference participants.  Evidence gathered on the program’s effectiveness will encourage libraries nationwide to replicate the Tales and Travel program or develop similar ones that employ this non-pharmacological, person centered approach.


Using Qualtrics to Compile & Evaluate Citations for the AMIA’s 2015 “Year in Review”

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Council Bluffs

Time: 1:05:00 PM

Stephanie Hendren, Graduate Student, Ebling Library, 750 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53705

Additional Contributors:

Mary Hitchcock, Senior Academic Librarian, Ebling Library, 750 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wi, 53705, mary.hitchcock@wisc.edu, 608.263.9332

Objective:  To utilize Qualtrics as an efficient method of compiling, distributing, and evaluating several hundred citations between a faculty member and eighteen post-graduate students nationally located. Methods: A librarian initiated the search for citations published from November 1, 2014 to October 31, 2015 using pre-selected keywords and journal titles, decided upon by the faculty member who was a member of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). Additional keywords and titles were added to subsequent searches for a total of approximately 1400 citations found. A Qualtrics survey was then created to compile the citations and create a “scoring grid” for items that should be included in the AMIA’s Year in Review. Eighteen students were given access to a total of 724 questions via Qualtric’s randomization feature. Each citation was then rated on perceived quality and given a 5-10 word summary of its contents. The randomization was set up to randomly distribute 41 questions to each student. Results: Overall, using Qualtrics to distribute a large number of questions to be “rated” to a large number of people worked very well. However, the randomization feature presented challenges that resulted in a small pool of unanswered questions. To handle the rest of the citations that had not been covered by the initial survey, we distributed a simple word document that mimicked the question format from the survey. Conclusion:  Many features within Qualtrics make it an appealing program to use for a large project involving the evaluation of citations, but certain program limits can raise difficulties during its use.


The Cost Impact of the Librarian: A Methodology Taking Us Beyond Value

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Council Bluffs

Time: 1:25:00 PM

Claire Hamasu, Associate Director, Eccles Health Sciences Library, 10 North 1900 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5890

Additional Contributors:

Kari Jones, PhD, kjones@qhr-econ.com; John Bramble, john.bramble@utah.edu; Barb Jones jonesbarb@health.missouri.edu

Objectives: Due to healthcare reform, hospital administrators are looking at the financial impact of departments to the institution. Our objective: develop a methodology that would show cost impact of the librarian to investigate the hypothesis that librarians have a favorable impact on the cost of patient care. Methods: A review of the literature revealed a few studies looking at the cost impact of the librarian on patient care starting in 1994. More research looks at the non-financial value of library service on patient care. Both types of research (value impact only and financial value) show that health care providers handled patient care differently as a result of library services. Data showed definite or probable impact. A health economist reviewed both value impact only and financial value studies. She also interviewed librarians who increased her understanding of how librarians interact and provide search services to clinicians. Using this knowledge she wrote a guide that can be used to conduct a study(s). Conclusion: Application of the methodology would result in determining  the cost savings of mediated literature searches. One would be based on cost savings based on the salary of who does the search–clinician versus librarian. Another would be based on improved decision and/or averted events. The challenge of doing this type of study is that many health care facilities do not have a mechanism for determining cost of patient care. They would have no way of determining how much improved decisions and/or averted events actually saved them.


Can a Project Blossom with Seed Money?

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Council Bluffs

Time: 1:45:00 PM

Dana Abbey, Health Information Literacy Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region, 12950 E. Montiview Blvd., Rm 3101F, Aurora, CO, 80045

INTRODUCTION: Successfully moving an initiative or project forward or to another level can stall or fail due to limited human and/or financial capital. While collaborating may seem like too much work, it can allow for shared workloads and budgets, greater creative input, and innovative approaches to problem-solving.  OBJECTIVE: To determine if providing seed monies (up to $1,500) would encourage new projects or enhance existing collaborative projects involving health and/or science information between a library and a K-12 school entity, and produce projects that could serve as models for other organizations. METHODS: A call for proposals was issued. Seven applications were submitted to an online form asking applicants to describe the proposed project, three project objectives, method of project evaluation, and a description of how the award would be allocated. Six awards of up to $1,500 were funded.  RESULTS:TBD. CONCLUSIONS: TBD.


Planning a 3D Printer Pilot: How Hard Can It Be?

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Davenport

Time: 1:05:00 PM

Edith Starbuck, Associate Information Services Librarian, University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0574

Additional Contributors:

Tiffany Grant, joffritm@ucmail.uc.edu; Kristen Burgess,burgeskt@ucmail.uc.edu; Sharon Purtee, purteesa@ucmail.uc.edu

In the fall of 2015 the Informatics Strategic Initiative Implementation Group at the University of Cincinnati Health Sciences Library (HSL) began developing a 3D printer pilot that would run over a 4 week span during spring semester.  Data from the pilot would help inform the Health Sciences Library Administration whether offering 3D printing as a self-sustaining (i.e. cost recovery) service based in the library was a viable option.  On paper, the 3D printer pilot plan seemed straightforward but as soon as the group delved into the details, straightforward shifted into complicated, challenging, and fraught with unimagined delays.  This presentation will provide an overview of the labyrinth that was navigated to launch the 3D printer pilot — from selecting the dates of the trial to training methods for student assistants to data collection software to how many colors of filament to allow during the trial.  Additionally, it will provide a summary of the student and faculty response to the pilot and how the data collected informed our decision on providing a 3D printing service based out of the HSL.


Merging Past and Present through Library Space Redesign: Converging New Library Identity

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Davenport

Time: 1:25:00 PM

Stevo Roksandic, Regional Director of Library Services, Mount Carmel Health System, 127 S Davis Ave, CLE Building 3rd floor, Columbus, OH, 43222

The imperative of medical/academic Libraries in today’s digital age remains strongly rooted in serving as a place for education and research. Contemporary trends demand the redesign of traditional Library spaces to conform to the new values and functions of today’s digital environments and users’ information behaviors. An improved operational and staffing structure positioned our Library as a ‘hub’ to support a multi-site hospital and academic institution. To sustain the physical presence of the Library at multiple operating sites in an evolving organizational setting, the focus was primarily set on reinventing concepts of service flexibility and redesigning the architectural structure, predetermined in early 2000s. Recent transformation of the Main Library space into a unique ‘visual tribute’ reflecting over a century of Nursing education legacy has significantly revitalized the previous ‘warehouse-like’ space into a collage of murals, historic artifacts and memorabilia displays. This imaginative and entrepreneurial transformation created a sense of warmth, style and history by demonstrating how physical space can advance the organizational mission and influence users’ and visitors’ perceptions of the Library as a traditional center for learning, collaboration and socialization. Three additional Library operating sites were also transformed into digital information commons. The merging of an organizational operating site restructure, implementation of innovative services,  and continuous redesign of Library spaces is strongly reinforcing the convergence of the Library identity with the institutional mission and vision. Future research and evaluation of diverse user communities  will foster the integration of elements of  emerging library design trends and future organizational development.


Fact or Fiction: Understanding and Using Fair Use & Copyright

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Davenport

Time: 1:45:00 PM

John Jones, Instruction & Curriculum Librarian, Health Sciences Library, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Mail Stop A003, 12950 E Montview Blvd, Aurora, CO, 80045

Additional Contributors:

Ben Harnke, Education & Reference Librarian, 303-724-2146, Ben.Harnke@ucdenver.edu; Meghan Damour, Education & Reference Intern, 303-724-2130, Meghan.Damour@ucdenver.edu

Objectives: With all of the different materials and opinions concerning Fair Use & Copyright available to health sciences professors, our main purpose was to create a 60 minute education session to help sort fact from fiction so faculty would be more comfortable and confidant with their use of course materials. Methods: Our goal was to present a series of brief situations and have participants discuss their knowledge and understanding of copyright and fair use for these scenarios. Each vignette was followed with a current best practice suggestion. Potential solutions included things like linking to online articles, uploading to secure course management systems, making freely available via the web but overall by always assessing risk using a Fair Use evaluation document. An education session survey instrument was used to capture feedback concerning the presentation and identify participants who might need or want individualized follow-up concerning Fair Use & Copyright. Our secondary purpose was share our slides and materials with other health sciences librarians to adapt and reuse for similar purpose at their institutions. Results: The classes are scheduled for February 18th, March 17th and April 7th.  We will report on the success or failure of these 3 classes including information from the class evaluation.  We will incorporate the findings from the July, August & September classes for the October presentation. Conclusions: We anticipate that participants will be unfamiliar with a Fair Use Checklist and also that some of their current practices may flirt with edge of Fair Use or may be a copyright violation.  We hope the participants will also help identify unique situations to be considered and incorporated in subsequent classes.


MeSH Mess – Authority Clean-Up Project using Innovative (III) and Other Free Tools

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Davenport

Time: 2:05:00 PM

Euemduan C. Osmera, Digital Tangible Media Cataloger, University of Nebraska Medical Center, McGoogan Library of Medicine, 986705 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-6705

Background:  The University of Nebraska Medical Center, McGoogan Library of Medicine’s contract with Innovative (III) was soon to expired and our new Collection Development and Metadata Manager contemplated on a new system, so the head cataloger proactively started to experiment with some database clean-up — starting with the Medical Subject Headings authority file.  Objectives:  This paper informs and shows the process of how a small staff of three: a cataloging librarian and two cataloging assistants use Create Lists, Excel, NLM Authority and MarcEdit to clean-up MeSH Authority. Methods:  Interviews/consults other cataloging librarians and Social Media/Literature Reviews. Results:  Results will discuss and show the process of how inelegant, brute-force and intricate of different tools used. Conclusions:  Conclusions will discuss the pros and cons of an in-house clean-up versus using a vendor.  And also will discuss further work.


Librarian’s Role in Research Reproducibility

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon A

Time: 1:05:00 PM

Darell Schmick, Research Librarian, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah, 10 N 1900 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112

Additional Contributors:

Melissa Rethlefsen, Deputy Director, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah, Melissa.Rethlefsen@utah.edu

Objective: Researchers and clinicians within the biomedical research complex are focusing on means for reducing wasted effort and replicable results in the literature. Increasingly, librarians are being identified for their utility in this process. Methods: We explored the librarian’s role in promoting research reproducibility through a review of the literature, contact with librarian advocates, and through our faculty’s work in promoting systematic review reproducibility. We worked with campus partners to promote the idea of the librarian’s role in research reproducibility. Results: Librarians are identified as a partner in increasing value and reducing waste within research in medicine in the literature through the promotion of reporting guidelines, contributing to systematic reviews, using and advocating for reproducible literature searching methods, and conducting and facilitating training on performing reproducible research. This is a growing area for advocacy for librarians internationally. Locally, we built on the momentum around reproducibility by partnering with our Vice President for Research (VPR) to create a guide for research reproducibility, engaging in campus discussions around reproducibility, and sponsoring a regional conference on how institutions can support reproducibility with our VPR. Librarian promotion of research reproducibility has been well received on our campus. Conclusions: A growing body of literature is developing advocating librarian engagement in the biomedical research process. Promoting research reproducibility through varied means, as fits within a librarian’s organizational structure, is a growing opportunity for librarian engagement in biomedical research.


Supporting Researchers in Finding Funding at a Large Academic Institution

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon A

Time: 1:25:00 PM

Merle Rosenzweig, Informationist, University of Michigan Taubman Health Sciences Library, 1135 E. Catherine St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109

Additional Contributors:

Judy Smith, Taubman Health Sciences Library, 1135 E. Catherine St. Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, 734 936-1636, judsmith@umich.edu; Amy Puffenberger, Marketing Communications Specialist, University of Michigan Medical School  Office of Research, 2800 Plymouth Rd Bldg 520, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, 734-763-4086, apuffenb@umich.edu; Ann Curtis, Director of Marketing, University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research, 2800 Plymouth Rd Bldg 520, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, 734-615-9147, accurtis@umich.edu

Objective: Our objective was to create a comprehensive guide and personalized Consultation service to serve as a centralized, campus-wide solution for helping faculty find funding resources, identify grant-writing training opportunities, and locate special events focused on funding resources.  Methods:  A survey created by the Medical School’s Office of Research (OoR) in a large academic institution identified researchers’ frustration with the time and effort it takes to search for new funding opportunities. To meet the needs of researchers, librarians and informationists partnered closely with the Medical School’s Office of Research and other units on campus to develop a Research Funding and Grants Guide.  Informationists and key stakeholders across campus met on a regular basis to design a visually appealing and easily navigable online guide. In conjunction with the guide, informationists developed a triage model to provide tailored consultations for investigators across campus, regardless of discipline.  Core components of these consultations include: 1) orienting researchers to the Guide; 2) making users aware of resources available to them at U-M, such as internal competitive opportunities; and 3) Setting up information alerts in the funding database COS/PIVOT. Conclusion: Researchers consider the task of locating funding to support their projects both time consuming and complex. The collaborative efforts described in this paper in providing a guide that is both comprehensive and yet easy to navigate can serve as a model for others in the role of assisting researchers in searching for available funding.


Adventures in Bibliometrics:  Research Impact and the CTSI

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon A

Time: 2:05:00 PM

Katherine Chew, Research/Outreach Services Librarian, University of Minnesota, 505 Essex Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455

Additional Contributors:

Caitlin Bakker, Biomedical/Research Services Liaison,  (612) 301-1353, cjbakker@umn.edu

Objectives: Bibliometrics, the application of quantitative analysis to publications, is of growing importance for institutions, departments, and research centers. This paper describes one library’s collaboration with a Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) to employ evaluative bibliometrics to determine research impact.  Methods: The Libraries were approached by the CTSI Monitoring & Evaluation Team to engage in a process of identifying and implementing the most appropriate bibliometrics for evaluation purposes. This initiative leveraged the library’s understanding of NIH’s Public Access Compliance Monitor, Scopus, Web of Science, and research networking systems such as SciVal Experts and Pure. Using grant information, a strategy was developed to identify CTSA-funded publications and to calculate and represent effective measures of impact. Results: For the first time the CTSI had the ability to benchmark supported publications against research publication productivity at the University, at other universities, across disciplines, against six other CTSA sites and track progress across the years of the CTSA grant.  Conclusions: The Libraries was able to contribute high quality, standardized metrics to evaluating the University CTSI’s impact in clinical translational and team science of their contributions to advancing health research that can make a difference to individual and population health.  In addition, provide useful information for their recent grant applications where standardized bibliometric analytics will be very valuable in strengthening the proposals.


Building Capacity for a Systematic Review Core in an Academic Health Sciences Library

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon A

Time: 1:45:00 PM

Mellanye Lackey, Associate Director for Education and Research, Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112

Additional Contributors:

Mary McFarland, mary.mcfarland@utah.edu; Melissa Rethlefsen, melissa.rethlefsen@utah.edu; Michelle Fiander, michelle.fiander@utah.edu

Objective:  After an unsuccessful bid to fund a permanent full time librarian specializing in systematic reviews, the library partnered with the Population Health Foundation of the Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) and shifted to a model of charging groups for librarian’s expertise to participate in systematic reviews. Methods:  Two librarians and one library staff member provide the expertise for systematic reviews. Two hours of free consultation include reviewing best practices for conducting a systematic review, confirming the group has adequate capacity to conduct a true systematic review, clarifying the scope of the project, and encouraging the group to register a protocol for the review. After the free, two hour consult, the librarian will create search strategies for relevant databases, download citations into EndNote, export a de-duplicated library, get full text pdfs, and write up the methods section for the final manuscript. Librarians are to be named as authors on the final manuscript.  Results: SR teams have been willing to pay for librarian expertise. Another librarian was hired as an “Evidence Retrieval and Knowledge Synthesis Librarian” to work full time on systematic reviews. The salary of the new librarian is paid for two years by the library, using the chargeback method to sustain the salary in the future. One limitation of the project is that groups may avoid asking the library for help, regardless of the free two hours, because they do not have funds to fully include a librarian. Quality of those reviews may suffer.  Conclusion:  The chargeback model has been very successful, with multiple groups requesting librarian participation. Collaboration with the Population Health Foundation of the CCTS has led to new research partnership and increased advocacy for our services.


Teaching Together: Merging Diverse Expertise into Collaborative Interdisciplinary Instruction

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon B

Time: 1:05:00 PM

Rebecca Carlson McCall, Mercy College of Nursing and Health Sciences Library Director, Southwest Baptist University, 4431 S. Fremont Ave., Springfield, MO, 65804

Additional Contributors:

Cindy Todd, Nursing Instructor, Mercy College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Southwest Baptist University, 4431 S. Fremont Ave, Springfield, MO 65804, ctodd@sbuniv.edu, 417-820-2055

OBJECTIVE: A medical librarian and a nurse educator partnered to teach online courses in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at one university. The goal of this instruction partnership was to improve students’ professional writing skills, knowledge of information literacy and evidence-based practice concepts, and ability to integrate evidence into practice. METHODS: Previously published library and nursing education literature indicates that collaborations between librarians and nursing faculty are positive experiences for educators and can improve student learning. For this interdisciplinary collaboration the medical librarian and nurse educator worked together to develop a new course that focused on the basics of library research and professional writing in healthcare and co-taught an existing course on research and evidence based practice.  RESULTS: After one year of this interdisciplinary instruction collaboration, both instructors have learned from each other new strategies for learning experiences, assessment, and evaluation. Student feedback during and after each course is very positive; the students have appreciated having instructors with different subject expertise developing assignments and guiding their learning.  CONCLUSIONS: The instructors have gained collaboration strategies that will be helpful to others interested in interdisciplinary instruction.  This paper will share tips and tools for successful interdisciplinary collaboration in distance education.


Converging to Meet Information Literacy Competencies

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon B

Time: 1:25:00 PM

Heather Collins, Assistant Director Research and Learning, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Mail Stop 1050, Kansas City, KS, 66160

Additional Contributors:

Julie Hartwell, jhartwell@kumc.edu; Heather Healy, ksuhealy@gmail.com; Rachel Vukas, rvukas@kumc.edu

The New Literacies Alliance (NLA) consortial collaboration creates online, open access lessons that are based on the Association of College and Research Library’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Librarians and faculty can freely embed these lessons into their courses and become members of the collaboration to converge with other institutions in the creation of new content. Applicable to any health sciences disciplines, the lessons teach strategic searching, evaluating authority, and understanding the scholarly conversation, allowing students to learn information literacy competencies through self-paced, interactive modules. This session will cover various levels of implementation and strategies for getting started.


An Inventory of Professional Nursing Association Evidence-Based Practice Continuing Education Training and Instruction

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon B

Time: 1:45:00 PM

Kerry Dhakal, Assistant Professor and Research and Education Librarian, Health Sciences Library, The Ohio State University, 376 W. 10th Avenue, Rm 208, Columbus, OH, 43210

Objective: To explore which professional nursing associations offer evidence-based practice (EBP) continuing education (CE) courses or EBP training activities and to determine if librarians are involved in instructional roles for EBP CE courses or EBP training activities.  Methods: Professional nursing associations’ websites and conference repositories were reviewed and inventoried to identify EBP CE courses or EBP training activities. Librarian participation in these courses as instructors or co-instructors was also recorded. A descriptive survey will be used to gather data directly from librarians working at professional nursing associations to elicit why it seems that librarians are not participating in the instruction of EBP CE courses or EBP training activities. This sample of librarians was identified by searching professional nursing association websites and the Medical Library Association Membership Directory. Results: Of 36 professional nursing associations identified, 24 offer EBP CE courses or EBP training activities.  Despite librarians working at professional nursing associations, none of the professional nursing association EBP CE listings included librarians as instructors or co-instructors. Data gathered from the librarian survey will provide greater insight into why librarians are not teaching EBP CE courses or EBP training activities. Conclusion: Professional nursing associations are offering EBP CE courses or EBP training activities in 2015-2016.  Surprisingly, however, librarians were not listed as instructors or co-instructors for any of the EBP CE courses or EBP training activities identified.  There seems to be a gap between librarian employment at professional nursing associations and their integration in EBP CE courses or EBP training activities.


AAHSL Task Force Evaluating AAMC Core EPAs

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 1

Room: Salon B

Time: 2:05:00 PM

Kelly Thormodson, Interim Director, University of North Dakota, 1301 N Columbia Rd Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND, 58202

Additional Contributors:

Heather Collins, MLS, AHIP, University of Kansas Medical Center, A.R. Dykes Health Sciences Library, Kansas City, KS, hcollins@kumc.edu, (913) 588-7330; Iris Kovar-Gough, MA, MLIS, AHIP, Michigan State University Libraries, East Lansing, MI 48824, iriskg@mail.lib.msu.edu, (517) 884-0909, Elizabeth Lorbeer, EdM, MLS, AHIP, WMed Library, Western Michigan University School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, elizabeth.lorbeer@med.wmich.edu, (269) 337-6119; Nancy Adams, Harrell Health Sciences Library, Penn State College of Medicine, nadams@hmc.psu.edu, (717) 531-8989; Emily Brennan, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Library, 171 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425, brennane@musc.edu, (843) 792-9275; Joey Nicholson, MLIS, MPH, New York University Health Sciences Library,  joseph.nicholson@med.nyu.edu, (212) 263-8934; Rikke Ogawa, MLS, AHIP, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, rikke.ogawa@library.ucla.edu, (310) 794-1907; Neil Rambo, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Health Sciences Library,  neil.rambo@med.nyu.edu, (212) 263-6990 ; Judy Spak, MLS, AHIP, Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, judy.spak@yale.edu, (203) 737-2961; Megan von Isenburg, MSLS, AHIP, Duke University, Medical Center Library & Archives, megan.vonisenburg@duke.edu, (919) 660-1131

Objective: To describe the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) task force investigating the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency. Methods: In May 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) published the Core EPAs for Entering Residency. In response to this change, in the Spring of 2016, AAHSL formed a task force to evaluate how the new Core EPAs will affect the medical school and thus the engagement of librarians in that curriculum. The task force is charged with identifying libraries participating in Core EPA activities, developing a methodology to characterize the nature of participation, and mapping and cross-referencing existing competencies. The task force will focus on two of the 13 EPAs, specifically EPA 7, form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care, and EPA 13, identify system failures and contribute to a culture of safety and improvement. Results: The AASHL task force will share findings and recommendations on the roles of libraries in competency-based medical education through a white paper and presentations. This session will provide an overview of the work of the task force, results of a national survey, and how medical librarians can utilize this information in the future.


Partnering with TechPro to Provide Access to Hidden Collections

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Cedar Rapids

Time: 3:05:00 PM

Sharon A. Purtee, Technical Services Librarian, University of Cincinnati – Health Sciences Library, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0574

The amount of materials shelved in libraries but only represented in local catalogs, or even worse, not at all, continues to impede scholarship.  Unfortunately, the University of Cincinnati Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions has a significant amount of materials that fall into this category.  When this Center returned administratively to the Health Sciences Library, the attitude toward cataloging those materials went from “do it as you can” to “it’s now an equal part of your cataloging responsibilities.” As the sole Technical Services staff member for the Health Sciences Library, I had to explore solutions. Two years ago, staff of the Winkler Center and the Metadata Librarian from Langsam Library began discussing the possibility of a TechPro contract for the 19th and 20th century foreign language titles; e.g. items which would require primarily original cataloging. After evaluating the ROI, the project was dropped. In mid-2015, the Winkler Center archivist and I re-evaluated the TechPro concept and revised the parameters, looking instead at sending materials that had copy available in OCLC.  This presentation will discuss the current contract and its implementation from selection to shipment, the original plan and why it was discarded, and the impact on resource discovery of materials that have been cataloged and returned to the HSL. Finally, impact on staff in both the Winkler Center and the HSL will be addressed.


Enhancing Scholarly Visibility Using an Institutional Repository as a Springboard for Scholarly Profiles in a Multi-Hospital Health Care System

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Cedar Rapids

Time: 3:25:00 PM

Brenda Fay, Research and Instructional Services Librarian, Marquette University, , , ,

Additional Contributors:

Jennifer Deal, Librarian Lead, Aurora Health Care; Deb Simpson, Medical Education Program Director, Aurora Health Care – Milwaukee, WI; Dave Stout, Bepress/Digital Commons, Berkeley, CA

In 2014 Aurora Health Care (AHC) Libraries licensed Digital Commons to act as our Institutional Repository (IR) including supporting am open-source journal clinical journal. To optimize and integrate the repository’s  full functionality AHC librarians explored ways use the Digital Commons to meet institution needs including increasing the visibility of the scholarly activities emerging from our medical education and research programs. In 2016 we licensed SelectedWorks – a module that allows for creation of scholarly profiles and piggybacks off Digital Commons to integrate content with the strong education and research stakeholder support.  These groups identified and have now implemented SelectedWorks features to: track scholarly output for education accreditation purposes (ACGME), make department scholarship more visible to internal and external stakeholders, and to track “reach” through mapping features. This presentation will describe the hurdles and benefits we encountered during our initial deployment and continued use of SelectedWorks. Attendees will gain: staffing and financial investment insights and strategies for creating participants’ research profiles. Dave Stout, from Bepress, will present two new services recently provided to our community: Expert Gallery, and Readership Dashboards.  These new services present fresh, relevant approaches for our community to proactively look ahead to fill gaps in non-traditional hospital/health care library services, while adding value to their local community.


Bad Apps: There’s One in Every Bunch

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Council Bluffs

Time: 3:05:00 PM

Jennifer Herron, Emerging Technologies Librarian, Indiana University School of Medicine, 975 W. Walnut Street., IB 100, Indianapolis, IN, 46202

Objective:  To identify a fast and easy method of recognizing potentially bad (harmful/misleading) apps that are being promoted as medical or health related. Methods: I was interested in finding a way to promote app evaluation for consumers that would be fast and easy enough that it would reduce any barriers to implementation. Much like health information on the internet, medical and health apps are abundant in app stores, but lack regulation and oversight as to their credibility. I wanted to develop a quick method of identifying these apps to prevent consumers from using them as a health/medical substitute. I also wanted to promote this method of app evaluation to the medical community in hopes that they can pass the information along to their patients and share with colleagues.  I began by reviewing apps that were reviewed by medical professionals and found to be useful and beneficial. I looked at the “good apps” traits and then compared them to the “bad apps” which were found to be inaccurate and untrustworthy.  Results: I was able to identify three main areas that need reviewed when evaluating health/medical apps: author information, category identity, and reviews. I am in the process of designing a mobile app evaluation workshop that will be held in the library and can be requested at off-site locations.


Inter-professionals Converge to Create a Health App Service

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Council Bluffs

Time: 3:25:00 PM

Erica Lake, Associate Librarian, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, 10 N 1900 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105

Additional Contributors:

Jean P. Shipman, Director, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, jean.shipman@utah.edu; Heidi Greenberg, Research Associate; Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library; heidi.greenberg@utah.edu

Objectives: Mobile health technologies have the potential to improve health outcomes, lower health care costs, and encourage patients to become more engaged in their care. An inter-professional committee, led by the library, established a hospital app bar where patients and visitors can learn about a vetted collection of apps and wearables. Methods: The service enables visitors to test-drive and download vetted apps and examine wearable devices, while a staff of students and librarians address questions and assist with installation and use. The process that went into creating this service will be shared, including the composition of the steering committee, the vetted collection and selection techniques, equipment, funding, publicity, branding, management, and staffing. Results: Information is collected from every encounter to illustrate impact. Satisfaction surveys appraise the usefulness of the instruction given, and solicit suggestions for improvement. Current metrics include the number of visitors, items demoed and downloaded, and wearables purchased at the hospital gift shop. Future metrics will include the number of provider referrals for apps and wearables, and qualitative and quantitative clinician feedback. Intense research regarding app efficiency is planned.  Conclusions: Librarians are natural partners with offering app services, with their skills in evaluating and assessing resources, and in connecting individuals to the right information at the right time, regardless of medium. Visitors appreciate help in navigating and using exploding mobile technologies, and providers are more comfortable recommending apps vetted by their peers through a local formulary.


Benefits of Participating in a Mobile App Evaluation Project

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Council Bluffs

Time: 3:45:00 PM

Alicia Lillich, NN/LM MCR Kansas/Technology Coordinator, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160

Additional Contributors:

John Bramble

Purpose: From 2014-2016, the NN/LM MidContinental Region (MCR) provided funds for two cohorts of qualifying Network members to purchase apps via iTunes or Google Play. In exchange, these participants were required to share their experience using these apps with the NN/LM MCR community. This paper examines if participants in this project found it beneficial and if it improved their confidence in their ability to evaluate apps. Methodology: Two cohorts of participants were each asked to review apps over a one-year period. To qualify, the applicant had to be a librarian from a NN/LM MCR Full Network member institution; agree to evaluate at least four for fee mobile apps appropriate to their work environment; and submit their evaluations by the established deadlines. Evaluators were equipped with an App Evaluation Report Form (AERF) to help develop a systematic and critical evaluation of mobile apps. The AERF guided the users to report on an app’s: authority of information sources; accuracy and objectivity; currency of information; organization and usability; purpose; and how it compares with other apps. After completing the project, participants were asked to respond to a brief questionnaire about their experience. Outcome: In year 1, 9 (81%) of 11 evaluators reported that being a participant in the project benefited their program. In year 2, 16 (84%) participants either strongly agreed or agreed that they feel more confident in their ability to evaluate mobile apps.


EBM Information Skills Online: From an Elective to a Required Course

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Davenport

Time: 3:05:00 PM

Assako N. Holyoke, Medical Reference Librarian, Saint Louis University, 1402 South Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63104

An online elective for fourth year medical students with a successful track record in teaching EBM information skills led to the development of a required online course for third year medical students just starting clinical clerkships. How different is it to develop a required course for nearly 180 students compared to an online elective for 30 students? This presentation will address issues an online course developer may face when designing an online course for the first time, with special reference to the way those issues vary for electives versus required courses and how they vary with the size of the audience. What does it take to develop a required course fully offered online? How different it is compared to an elective? How do these differences affect the course from the point of view of the instructor? The author will answer these questions based on her experience and review of literature by emphasizing the learner and in particular, the learning assessment to determine the outcome, including students’ perception of online courses.


The Role of Embedded Librarians Within an Active Learning Curriculum

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Davenport

Time: 3:25:00 PM

Dawn Hackman, Librarian, University of North Dakota, 1919 Elm St N, Fargo, ND, 58102

Additional Contributors:

Amber Amidon, Marcia Francis, Erika Fischer, Annie Nickum, Kelly Thormodson

Objective: This paper continues to examine the efforts of one small academic health sciences library to create a role for its embedded librarians. This paper follows a paper presented at CHLA/MLA Mosaic 2016 in May and discusses the successes and failures of the librarians to establish a new pedagogical culture which emphasizes the use of active learning in its professional health sciences programs. Methods: In summer 2016, the library moved into a new health sciences building. Librarians are now located throughout the building rather than centrally located within a “library” space. With this new proximity to students and classroom space, the librarians will be more accessible for spontaneous questions. In addition to the relocation of librarian office space, librarians have been included in recent curriculum discussions that have led both classroom instructors and librarians to strive to incorporate active learning pedagogies. Results: Librarians will report on the early successes and challenges of moving to a new educational space and their intentional collaboration with classroom faculty.  Conclusion: It is hoped that student engagement with librarians will increase and that students will become more comfortable with advancing their research strategies to include the high quality information sources that are provided by the medical school rather than relying on familiar strategies such as a quick Google search.


Active Learning: A Case Study in Music Therapy; Merging Music and Medicine

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Davenport

Time: 3:45:00 PM

Kelly Thormodson, Assistant Director, Library Resources, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 501 N Columbia Rd. Stop 9002 SMHS, Grand Forks, ND, 58202

Additional Contributors:

Kristen Borysewicz, MLS, Information Literacy Coordinator, Reference Librarian & Subject Specialist: Art, Theatre, Music, English, Communication, 3051 University Ave Stop 9000, Chester Fritz Library, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9000, 701-777-4647; Meganne K. Masko, PhD, MT-BC/L, Assistant Professor of Music and Arts Technology, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Objective: Active Learning is defined as any instructional method that engages students in the learning process.  Members of the UND faculty and librarians were invited to an active learning seminar in January of 2016.  Methods: The result was a curriculum change to the Music Therapy theories and methods course by the faculty and the inclusion of two library liaisons (music and medicine) in the incorporation of authentic case-based learning segments added to the semester in February and April. Both librarians were invited to the class to teach the undergraduates from the different perspectives in their content areas.  The students were able to see both some foundational critical thinking work involved in the research process, as well as the need to vary the search approach to match the particular research task.  The librarians created a LibGuide to highlight resources available from both libraries and released more information on the guide as the case progressed. Results: The faculty member administered surveys measuring critical thinking skills development, as well as the usefulness of helpfulness of the librarians’ inclusion, after each case-based learning unit. Conclusions: This paper will look at the collaboration of faculty and librarians from different libraries on campus and using active learning techniques in the presentation of material by the librarians as well as the use of a clinical case-based example used in a non-health science classroom.


This is How We Do It: Picking From a Plethora of Programs for Producing Streaming and Instructional Materials

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Davenport

Time: 4:05:00 PM

Jennifer Herron, Emerging Technologies Librarian, Indiana University School of Medicine, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, 975 West Walnut St., IB-325, Indianapolis, IN, 46202

Additional Contributors:

Amy E. Blevins, Elizabeth C. Whipple, Sue London, Jason Lilly – Indiana University School of Medicine, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, 975 W. Walnut St., IB-100, Indianapolis, IN 46202

Objective: To evaluate various programs for tutorial production, streaming classes, and video conferencing options in order to determine which programs are the most useful for library faculty and staff. / Methods: We were interested in finding out what tools are available for tutorial creation, video/web conferencing, and live streaming, all for the purpose of sharing educational materials with our users. As a distributed medical school, we have learners in many locations across the state and world and want to provide equitable access to the educational resources and sessions we create. We began by creating a Tutorials Taskforce, divided up the work, and evaluated a plethora of tools. After classifying the tools into three categories (formal tutorials creation, quick reference tutorials, and lecture capture), the group decided to first focus on software programs for tutorial creation. The taskforce evaluated and tested the programs by creating mini tutorials on several platforms. We then created a chart to highlight/show what programs were best for which needs. The chart will be used, along with faculty and staff training, to streamline tutorial creation activities. Results: Results will be presented at the Merge and Converge Conference.


The Role of Academic Librarians in Promoting Digital Wellness on Campus

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Dubuque

Time: 3:05:00 PM

Amber Loos, Health Sciences Librarian, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 605 Agriculture Dr, Carbondale, IL, 62901

Cyberchondria, video game addiction, Facebook depression, and text claw are just a few of the many psychological and physical issues that can arise from our increasing overreliance on digital technologies. Digital wellness, or how a person manages to physically and mentally deal with the constant barrage of these digital technologies, is a timely issue on college campuses where research has shown students are susceptible to burnout as a result of Internet addiction. Academic librarians are in a unique position to spearhead initiatives that help college students learn how to positively cope with the psychological and physical stressors of technology. This presentation outlines the most recent literature on this topic and provides a case study of one academic library’s outreach activities aimed at promoting digital wellness on its campus.


Zombies Ate My Evidence: The EBM Diagnostic Challenge to Save the World

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Dubuque

Time: 3:25:00 PM

Jason Bengtson, Assistant Director, Library IT Services, Kansas State University, 1117 Mid-Campus Drive North, Manhattan, KS, 66506

Additional Contributors:

Amy Blevins; Elizabeth Kiscaden

Purpose: Medical and physician assistant students at a large Midwestern university have utilized a formal evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) curriculum during their pre-clerkship courses for several years. The medical college is now working to expand the EBCP curriculum into the required clerkships. Two librarians involved with this process decided that a fun and innovative way to approach this process would be to create a proof of concept module on diagnostic principles using a zombie game format. Methods: Two librarians successfully applied for an Innovation Reward to hire an artist and an application developer for development of the game. They also enlisted the help of a local pediatrics faculty member to serve as a consultant regarding the accuracy of the scenarios and EBCP activities. The librarians worked together to develop a storyline and two activities for the game. The game has a zombie epidemic theme, and the main character is a resident at an academic hospital who is tasked with selecting a screening tool and a diagnostic tool based on sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. The game was built using a variety of technologies, with an extensible design. By using Angular.js and an easily editable data model, the application developer intended to create a proof of concept that could easily incorporate new scenes, quizzes, and artwork.  Results/Conclusion:  After several rounds of testing, including a live debut with students, the Zombies Ate My Evidence prototype demonstrated the feasibility of the underlying engine as a reliable and engaging tool for EBCP instruction.


Students and Health Videos Merge and Converge

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Dubuque

Time: 3:45:00 PM

Jean P. Shipman, Eccles Library Director, University of Utah, 10 North 1900 East, Bldg 589, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112

Additional Contributors:

Jean P. Shipman1, MSLS, AHIP, FMLA; Tallie Casucci1, MLIS; Anita Leopardi2, M. Ed., CHES – University of Utah, 1Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, 2Department of Health Education and Promotion, College of Health, 10 North 1900 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, 801-587-9052

Objective: To offer a student health video competition to encourage interdisciplinary students within at the University of Utah to create video health messages for peers and patients that will be incorporated within personal electronic health records, hospital patient television, as well as university and library websites.  Methods: A University-wide faculty committee planned a student health video competition that launched in fall 2015.  Details included: 1) competition requirements, 2) awards and judging rubrics, 3) promotion, and 4) a capstone event.  A large publicity campaign, including using social media, promoted the competition to students and faculty. Students self-formed interdisciplinary teams. Four awards were given at a capstone event. Foundation funding supported the awards and the accompanying social events.  Results: Competition details included: a snappy competition name and logo; criteria for team registration, formation and membership; instructions on how to obtain awards; and how to submit the videos.  Thirty-five teams created videos. Three winning videos were aired on the university’s television station and the Hospital’s patient education TV. All videos are viewable on EHSL’s website. Conclusions: Faculty participation on the planning team was rewarding as it acquainted faculty from across the University. Students were engaged and welcomed the opportunity to share health messages.  The publicity helped to highlight how EHSL brought together many individuals to create a successful collaborative student competition.


Wellness Wednesdays

Date: Sunday, October 23, 2016

Session 2

Room: Dubuque

Time: 4:05:00 PM

Tallie Casucci, Innovation Librarian, Eccles Health Sciences Library, 10 North 1900 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112

Additional Contributors:

Mellanye Lackey, mellanye.lackey@utah.edu; Joan M. Gregory, joan.gregory@utah.edu

Objective: To promote wellness among health sciences affiliates, the library collaborates with campus and local partners to offer diverse wellness activities. Additionally, presenters will lead the audience through a wellness activity during this presentation. Methods: The library partners with a professional massage therapist, yoga instructor certification program, local artists, guest lecturers, and a therapy pet volunteer organization to facilitate wellness. Additionally, the library offers coloring supplies, puzzles, and treadmill desks to promote wellness.  Results: Collaboration improves the library’s visibility and recognition within the community. By partnering with other entities, libraries can offer more diverse wellness activities. The massage therapist benefits from working within the library, which provides another location for the pilot chair massage program. Students in the yoga instructor certification program are required to complete ten volunteer hours. By partnering with the library, the yoga instructor certification program offers a consistent location and time for students to fulfill their volunteer hours. Local artists and guest lecturers present and discuss topics related to health and wellness. For example, art exhibits have included artwork from cancer patients and a healthcare professional recovering from trauma. During finals, the library hosts therapy dogs to alleviate stress and anxiety around exams.  Conclusions: As the library becomes known for wellness support, other partnership opportunities arise, such as hosting a flu shot clinic. While health sciences affiliates are participating in the “Wellness Wednesdays” activities, they meet library personnel and learn about other library services and events.