Program

Wednesday 13 Oct 2021

8:45 am - 9:00 am Day 1 Agenda

Note: As this conference spans several time zones, all times will be displayed in Central Time.

9:00 am - 11:00 am Continuing Education 1

*Limited to those who pre-registered to attend this session only.*

CE #1: Health Services and Policy Research: Sources and Strategies for Effective Information Searching.

Judy Smith, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Abe Wheeler, Michigan State University.

This hands-on workshop, requiring active participation, will provide participants with an introduction to health services and policy research information seeking. Participants will learn about the breadth of resources and leave with an understanding of the multi-pronged strategies needed to search on topics related to health care cost, quality, and access.  Resources covered will include national health policy resources, including data, as well as grey literature. 2 MLA CE

Wed 9:00 am - 11:00 am

11:00 am - 1:00 pm Continuing Education 2

*Limited to those who pre-registered to attend this session only.*

CE #2: Telling Our Story through Library Assessment: Assessment Types, Tools, and Practical Tips.

Jung Mi Scoulas, University of Illinois Chicago.

In this 2-hour workshop, the Assessment Coordinator of the University of Illinois Chicago Library will address the basics of library assessment, using examples from university library consultations. The first half of the workshop will cover the importance of library assessment and introduce a 9-step process for doing assessment to inform the assessment decision-making process. In the second hour, the instructor will lead participants through various real-life scenarios to practice how to approach assessment. Attendees will have an opportunity to share experiences with assessment and tips for various assessment tools. 2 MLA CE

Wed 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

1:15 pm - 1:25 pm Welcome & Meeting Opening

#MidwestMCMLA2021

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm RML Update

For Regions 1, 3, 4 & 6

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Exhibitor Roundtable Day 1

Meet this year's exhibitors and sponsors

4:00 pm - 4:30 pm Evening Social Hour: Special Event with Sam

Making Coffee at Home (No Espresso Machine Required) with Sam.

If you’ve been missing coffee at your favorite coffee shop, come to this very informal drop-in/drop-out session, where you’ll learn how to make your at-home brew better. This is a 30-minute special event beginning at 4:00 pm CT.

Share your at-home brew at #MidwestMCMLA2021

4:30 pm - 5:00 pm Evening Social Hour: Let the Fun Continue!

Join us for a short social with some show-and-tell or low-key game options. Your pet is welcome!

Thursday 14 Oct 2021

8:25 am - 8:30 am Day 2 Agenda

Note: As this conference spans several time zones, all times will be displayed in Central Time.

8:30 am - 8:40 am Welcome & Overview of Thursday

#MidwestMCMLA2021

8:45 am - 9:45 am Exhibitor Roundtable Day 2

Meet this year's exhibitors and sponsors

9:45 am - 10:45 am Morning Break Day 2

Stretch time!

10:00 am - 11:00 am Keynote Speaker

Nisha Mody, MLIS, MA CCC-SLP (she/her)

11:15 am - 1:00 pm Research Program Session 1: Papers

Tracks: Clinical and Outreach

11:15 am CT. Embedded Outreach: Clinical Librarians and the Electronic Health Record Message Basket.

Elizabeth Frakes, MSIS, AHIP, Shawn Steidinger, MLS, AHIP, Christy Jarvis, MLIS, AHIP, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah.

PURPOSE: This paper will describe the development process, implementation steps, planned marketing strategies, and outcomes of the library’s evidence request service embedded in the electronic health record (EHR).  
SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/RESOURCES: An academic health services system including several teaching hospitals and clinics, both in and out of state, served by an academic health sciences library with two clinical librarians who partnered with the institutional health information technology (IT) department, as well as health sciences faculty and trainees.  
BRIEF DESCRIPTION: After conducting a literature review on similar services and evaluating strengths and weaknesses of comparable models, librarians decided to leverage the EHR’s existing Message Basket system to connect providers with information experts. They created a mock-up of this approach and shared it with stakeholders, including library and hospital administrators, provider informaticists, and health IT. Buy-in and support from these individuals was critical to the successful launch and subsequent adoption of the service by providers.  
RESULTS/OUTCOMES: Launched in Summer 2020, user feedback has been uniformly positive. Satisfaction with the timeliness, accuracy, and relevance of the librarian-provided evidence is demonstrated by the existence of providers who utilize the service again after their initial interaction. A planned outreach and education program for incoming trainees is expected to further drive service utilization.  
EVALUATION METHOD: We will compare and analyze usage statistics from our current reference request system before the launch of the embedded service, and in the year after the launch of the service. 

Thu 11:15 am - 1:00 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
Clinical Track

11:36 am CT. The Library’s Role in the Development of a Clinical Evidence-Based Practice Mentor Program.

Kim Harp, MLS, McGoogan Health Sciences Library, University of Nebraska Medical Center; Christina Reames, MS, RN, ARPN-CNS; Rebecca Swanson, DNP, ARPN, CPNP.

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the Institute of Medicine set a goal that 90% of patient care would be evidence-based by the year 2020. However, in a 2019 survey of Nebraska Medicine (NM) nurses, less than 50% believed that their organization had the resources in place to support evidence-based practice (EBP). In 2020, McGoogan Health Sciences Library at University of Nebraska Medical Center entered into a formal agreement to provide access to library resources and services to its clinical partner, which addressed the barriers for NM’s nursing staff. The library designated a nursing liaison to assist the development of continuing education for its staff on EBP. This paper will describe the role of the liaison in providing access to library resources and services in clinical practice.  
DESCRIPTION: The liaison became a member of NM’s Nursing Research and Innovation Committee (NRIC). The NRIC committee was tasked with developing an initiative to encourage EBP among nursing staff by piloting an EBP mentor program. The liaison performed literature searches to assist the task force in identifying applicable EBP implementation models or frameworks, supported, and contributed to discussions regarding the instruction of EBP, and developed an instructional module regarding literature searching and evidence appraisal.  
CONCLUSION: Nebraska Medicine and the Library will build upon the success of this EBP mentor model and implement the program across NM. Formal evaluations from participants are forthcoming, yet the anecdotal feedback is positive. For the liaison, initial benefits of the EBP mentor model partnership include connecting with nursing and other clinical staff and ongoing insight into clinical nursing information needs, which can be applied in addressing information literacy and research skills in the academic setting. Through the EBP mentor model, McGoogan Library and NM have realized progress toward the common goal of supporting nursing research and innovation. 

Thu 11:15 am - 1:00 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
Clinical Track

11:57 am CT. JUNTOS Radio: Healthcare Providers, Librarians, and Community Members, Partner to Provide Credible Health Information through Spanish Podcasts.

Brenda Linares, University of Kansas Medical Center, Mariana Ramirez Mantilla

OBJECTIVE: The goal is to address health information needs within the Latinx community and connect them with health literacy skill-building tools and easy to understand health information and resources. Therefore, to address the increasing use of social media and digital technologies within the Latinx community, the JUNTOS Health Literacy project sought to reach out to this community, via recorded Spanish-language health educational programs (e.g., podcasts) complemented with evidence-based, Spanish language consumer health information from the National Library of Medicine.  
METHODS: The podcast segments created through this project included interviews with Spanish-speaking health professionals, updates on relevant health research topics in plain language, and storytelling from community members sharing health-related experiences and resources. Podcasts were recorded and posted every two weeks to Podbean, Facebook, YouTube, and other social media platforms. The project was funded by the National Library of Medicine and it was a collaboration of a health sciences librarian, healthcare professionals, community organizers, and the JUNTOS Center for Advancing Latino Health.  
RESULTS: We have 32 recordings posted bi-weekly since March 2020. We’ve had virtual feedback from users. When it came to acceptability, 84% liked the recordings, 85% said it helped them a lot, and 69% said that the content was very reliable. In terms of knowledge, 76% noted that after hearing the podcasts, they felt more knowledgeable about health topics, while 76% stated they were interested in visiting NLM resources.  
CONCLUSIONS: We want to continue recording the podcast on additional health topics. We also want to seek more funding for this project to continue. The more people who know about it, the more people will have a chance to learn about relevant health information topics in Spanish and reduce some of their misinformation. 

Thu 11:15 am - 1:00 pm
MCMLA, Program Description
Outreach Track

12:18 am CT. Book Clubs: Vehicles for Starting Health Conversations.

George Strawley, University of Utah; Michele Spatz, University of Washington; Darlene Kaskie, University of Iowa.

This session spotlights strategies that a health sciences or hospital library can use to promote health literacy through a perennial library favorite, the book club. A national campaign aimed to get library patrons, especially those in underserved communities, thinking and talking about health issues through discussions of books suitable for general audiences. The campaign’s approach provided a resource for libraries of all types to bring health issues front and center for their patrons. In an academic or hospital library, book discussions can help librarians contribute to organizational goals by engaging communities both within and outside their institutions. The presenters will discuss their project and share lessons learned about selecting health topics and books for discussion. They will also highlight resources to help facilitate a health-themed book club and provide value-added ideas for promoting health tied to book club themes.  

Thu 11:15 am - 1:00 pm
MCMLA, Program Description
Outreach Track

12:39 am CT. Cyberchondria and Online Health Information Seeking: A Scoping Review.

Amber T. Burtis, MLIS, MPH, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Susan M. Howell, MLS.

OBJECTIVE: This review aims to provide an overview of the literature on cyberchondria and online health information seeking in order to guide professional practice in consumer health settings such as libraries. A growing scholarly literature on cyberchondria exists, but its relevance and application to the field of library and information science has not been fully summarized.  
METHODS: A scoping review was performed. Relevant databases were searched to retrieve articles that report on cyberchondria and online health information seeking as they relate to library and information science settings. Articles which met the inclusion criteria were coded for analysis.  
RESULTS: Themes that emerged from the coded data are still being analyzed and will be fully reported in the final paper presentation.  
CONCLUSION: Previous research has established that there is a strong relationship between health anxiety and cyberchondria, which suggests that library patrons with health anxiety might especially be prone to experiencing counterproductive outcomes from online health information seeking. The practical implications of this relationship for libraries providing consumer health information services are not explicit. This research suggests avenues for future research to improve the applicability of scholarly literature on this topic to the library and information science field.  

Thu 11:15 am - 1:00 pm
Midwest, Research
Outreach Track

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch Break Day 2

Snap a picture or share your thoughts at #MidwestMCMLA2021

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Exhibitor Technology Showcase

See the latest library innovations and content offerings from exhibitors and sponsors.

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Research Program Session 2: Papers

Track: Education

3:00 pm CT. Coming to a Crossroad in EndNote Instruction: Experimenting with the Flip as an Instruction Method.

Megan Bell, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

OBJECTIVE: To compare 2 instruction methods for teaching graduate students EndNote. Researcher evaluated whether using flip classroom model with active learning (experimental, E) compared to in-class lecture and active learning (control, C) was better for graduate student confidence using EndNote, instruction satisfaction and knowledge retention regarding EndNote software.  
METHODS: Cluster sampling was used to recruit participants. Researcher used Campbell and Stanley post-test only design with random assignment. Classes were assigned to either (C) or (E). E was given EndNote tutorial one week prior to instruction. C was not given EndNote tutorial prior to session. Both groups received active learning instruction session. After instruction session, both E and C were given assessment which evaluated students’ confidence using EndNote, instruction satisfaction and knowledge retention. Confidence and satisfaction questions used Likert scale; questions evaluating knowledge retention used multiple choice and true false questions. Two-tailed Mann-Whitney U Test used to analyze distribution of grades and Likert scale of satisfaction and confidence.  
RESULTS: Study included 6 classes; 3 in E and 3 in C. C included 17 students; E included 8 students. All E participants completed tutorial prior to instruction session. Alpha 0.05 used as significance level for all tests. Grade P-value was 0.344. Satisfaction P-value was 0.215. Confidence P-value was 0.344.  
CONCLUSION: Data suggest there is no difference in grades, satisfaction with instruction session and confidence using EndNote between E and C. 

Thu 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Research
Education Track

3:22 pm CT. Exploring the Expectations and Preferences of Users in Regards to Health Sciences Library Subject Guides.

Anna Biszaha, The Ohio State University Health

OBJECTIVE: There is a general consensus that library subject guides are most effective when they are appropriately tailored to the needs of the target users; however, such guides can take considerable time and effort to create. As such, it is imperative to critically evaluate and reflect on their effectiveness. This study aimed to explore and describe user’s subject guide expectations and preferences, and perform an initial investigation into whether student and clinical users might engage with them differently. 
METHODS: An anonymous survey was administered during the winter of 2021 to collect data about user’s prior experience, expectations, and preferences regarding the subject guides.  
RESULTS: 206 responses were collected over the course of 4 weeks. The majority indicated they had used the HSL or its resources before, but not the subject guides. The most common technology used to access library resources was a laptop/desktop. Both guide users and non-users ranked quick and easy links as the most important feature of a guide; however, they differed when it came to the types of information they expected to find, the overall purpose of a guide, and what motivates them to seek one out. Clinical users represented only 5.8% of the total response pool, making it difficult to compare them to student users.  
CONCLUSION: By considering broad user expectations when engaging with library subject guides, this survey helps provide guidance and insight for those charged with developing them. A focus on increasing ease-of-use, overall usability, and awareness is key to their success.  

Thu 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Education Track

3:44 pm CT. Why Doesn't Anyone Want to Apply to our Jobs? A Qualitative Study on MLIS Graduate Student's Perceptions of and Interest in Health Sciences.

Christi Piper, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Samantha Wilairat, NLM Fellowship

OBJECTIVE: At a health sciences library on a medical campus, the library has two to three employment positions available for MLIS graduate students. Despite having two MLIS programs close to the medical campus, the graduate assistant supervisor generally sees few applications for the positions when they are available. The supervisor hypothesized that students were generally uninterested in health sciences librarianship. This study seeks to understand what students think of graduate employment in health sciences librarianship using a think-aloud protocol with structured follow-up questions.  
METHODS: Eighteen interviews were conducted. Participants were asked to read and think-aloud about four health sciences graduate employment position descriptions. Following the position descriptions, three follow-up questions were asked about students’ interest in health sciences librarianship before and after reading the position descriptions. The interviews will be coded inductively by two researchers who will use thematic analysis to look for themes.  
RESULTS: Results are forthcoming but will look at what MLIS students think health sciences librarianship entails and their understanding of specific health sciences terminology in position descriptions. Additionally, themes will be developed around student desires for general position details, such as location, salary, and working hours.  
CONCLUSION: While there is research about the benefits of graduate employment in libraries for MLIS students, there is little research about what student preferences are for graduate employment positions. We hope that this study will provide insight about how to provide desirable graduate employment opportunities within health sciences librarianship to improve the pipeline to health sciences librarianship.  

Thu 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
MCMLA, Research
Education Track

4:08 pm CT. Staying Current: Preferred Professional Development Methods of Health Science Librarians.

Margarita Shawcross, University of Northern Colorado

OBJECTIVES: Participating in professional development (continuing education) is an important component of librarianship. This is especially important in the health sciences where the amount and complexity of new health information can be overwhelming. Library professionals who specialize in the health sciences need to have a deep understanding of the unique needs of health sciences to support faculty research, enrich student learning and develop and manage comprehensive health collections. These library professionals rely on a variety of professional development resources to develop their skills in the field of health science librarianship. This research project seeks to learn the preferred methods of professional development by health science library professionals.  
METHODS: A survey was created using Qualtrics and seven instruction modalities were identified and included on the survey. The survey was sent out through various listservs used by health science librarians.  
RESULTS: Results are forthcoming. The researcher is eager to learn if survey participants prefer to participate in professional development accessed through virtual learning and/or social media or prefer more traditional methods such as conference participation or reading journals. Also, results will report how age and available funding impact the decision of which professional development modality to participate in.  
CONCLUSIONS: The researcher gathers that the results of this study will help new health librarians learn about preferred methods of professional development used by more experienced librarians and thus help them onboard sooner. The results may also be useful to library supervisors and administrators to identify the cost effectiveness of different types of professional development.  

Thu 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
Education Track

4:30 pm CT. Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS): Focusing on Library and Information School Graduate Students.

John Bramble and Samantha Nunn, University of Utah; Emily Vardell, Emporia State University; Brenda Linares, Kansas University Medical Center

BACKGROUND: For the past several years, several library organizations (NLM, NNLM, MLA, PLA, ALA, etc.) have been promoting the importance for those in the information access professionals to have the capability to offer quality consumer health information services as well as having the skills required to keep up to date with changes in consumer health information resources, technologies, and services. One program specifically designed to do this is the Medical Library Association (MLA) Consumer Health Information Specialization, which is designed to support librarians and others who seek to provide accurate and useful health information to the public, including students who have matriculated in library and information science (LIS) or iSchool graduate programs.  
DESCRIPTION: The authors partnered with the Medical Library Association (MLA) to develop a process designed to recognize the skills and knowledge gained by LIS and iSchool students completing qualifying consumer health courses through their graduate program with a MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certificate. CHIS is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their commitment of being capable of providing quality consumer health information services as part of their skillset. Being able to display this achievement through a certificate from an international professional organization is particularly attractive to students who are entering the job market or seeking promotions with their current employer. This presentation will describe the process of how to get courses pre-approved for CHIS Level I or II, report on feedback from participating professors and students, and detail how to get involved.  
CONCLUSION: The project is in the process of collecting feedback from students and professors, however preliminary results have been positive. The authors will report on the feedback collected by the conference deadline.  

Thu 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
Education Track

4:30 pm CT. Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS): Focusing on Library and Information School Graduate Students.

John Bramble and Samantha Nunn, University of Utah; Emily Vardell, Emporia State University; Brenda Linares, Kansas University Medical Center

BACKGROUND: For the past several years, several library organizations (NLM, NNLM, MLA, PLA, ALA, etc.) have been promoting the importance for those in the information access professionals to have the capability to offer quality consumer health information services as well as having the skills required to keep up to date with changes in consumer health information resources, technologies, and services. One program specifically designed to do this is the Medical Library Association (MLA) Consumer Health Information Specialization, which is designed to support librarians and others who seek to provide accurate and useful health information to the public, including students who have matriculated in library and information science (LIS) or iSchool graduate programs.  
DESCRIPTION: The authors partnered with the Medical Library Association (MLA) to develop a process designed to recognize the skills and knowledge gained by LIS and iSchool students completing qualifying consumer health courses through their graduate program with a MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) certificate. CHIS is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their commitment of being capable of providing quality consumer health information services as part of their skillset. Being able to display this achievement through a certificate from an international professional organization is particularly attractive to students who are entering the job market or seeking promotions with their current employer. This presentation will describe the process of how to get courses pre-approved for CHIS Level I or II, report on feedback from participating professors and students, and detail how to get involved.  
CONCLUSION: The project is in the process of collecting feedback from students and professors, however preliminary results have been positive. The authors will report on the feedback collected by the conference deadline.  

Thu 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
Education Track

Friday 15 Oct 2021

8:10 am - 8:15 am Day 3 Agenda

Note: As this conference spans several time zones, all times will be displayed in Central Time.

8:15 am - 8:45 am Morning Social

Bring your favorite morning beverage to enjoy while connecting with colleagues. Change your Zoom background to show the view out your window or a dream travel destination.

8:50 am - 9:00 am Welcome & Overview of Friday

#MidwestMCMLA2021

9:00 am - 10:00 am Research Program: Poster Viewing

This session includes Q&A.

Advocacy in Action: Making an Impact by Highlighting Members Advocacy Initiatives.

Kristy Steigerwalt, University of Missouri -Kansas City (UMKC); Jacob White, University of Kansas; Angela Spencer, Saint Louis University; Kiara Comfort; Emily Eresuma, Eccles Primary Children's Outpatient Services.

PURPOSE: This poster examines the implementation of various advocacy initiatives completed by the 2020-2021 Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association (MCMLA) Advocacy committee.  
SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/RESOURCES: The MCMLA Chapter of the Medical Library Association, which currently consists of 172 members (108 regular, 15 emeritus, 16 students, 33 vendors). The MCMLA Advocacy Committee consisted of four members and a chair from October of 2020-September 2021.  
BRIEF DESCRIPTION: During this time multiple advocacy projects were initiated and completed including renovating the MCMLA advocacy resources page, creating a populatable library value infographic, quarterly advocacy challenges for members, advocacy podcasts, and, in partnership with the Education Committee, a Journal club. This poster highlights one chapter’s advocacy initiatives over the course of a year.  
RESULTS/OUTCOME: Efforts to increase advocacy have anecdotally enhanced member engagement and a sense of community, provided members with avenues to promote advocacy at their institutions, as well as rewarding individual members for the valuable advocacy efforts. These foundational advocacy projects serve as novel examples other advocacy committees or individual members might consider pursuing.  
CONCLUSION: Advocacy efforts at both the individual and chapter level are essential elements in ensuring agency in the success of an organization. Advocacy efforts encourage libraries to be more active in promoting their impact, regardless of their setting. Several means of engaging in advocacy are suggested to improve idea-sharing within regional MLA chapters and to encourage similar engagement strengthening the position of health sciences libraries within individual institutions. 

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
MCMLA, Program Description
Poster

An Example of Librarian Participation in a Self-directed Learning Assignment for Medical Students.

Heather McEwen, MLIS, MS, Northeast Ohio Medical University, William McEwen, MLIS.

The evidence-based medicine curriculum for medical students provides multiple opportunities for students to practice their information seeking and evaluation skills. A librarian helped create the evidence-based medicine curriculum and a literature review assignment. One or more librarians have participated in the assignment each year. The LCME accreditation standard 6.3 is focused upon self-directed learning and life-long learning. Self-directed learning opportunities are expected to be within the medical curriculum. They must involve students determining their individual learning need, searching for resources to answer their question, and analyzing and synthesizing the information found. Students must also evaluate the quality of their chosen resources and receive faculty feedback on their skills. In 2020, the self-directed learning group made suggestions to adapt the existing literature review rubric to include self-directed learning components. Involvement in self-directed learning assignment requirements is a way for librarians to participate in the medical curriculum. For the literature review assignment, students must choose a clinical question to research and search for professional resources to answer their clinical question. Student performance on required self-directed learning components can also be determined to evaluate literature searching and evaluation skills. From these calculations, it can be determined if prior evidence-based medicine class sessions need to be refined to better prepare students for this assignment and other self-directed learning assignments within the medical curriculum. Discussion will include ways librarians can participate in self-directed learning.  

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Midwest, Program Description
Poster

Citing Tables and Figures and Copyright Attribution.

Marilia Antunez, University of Akron.

PURPOSE: This poster presentation examines the development of a self-paced tutorial for citing tables and figures in APA (American Psychological Association) Style, seventh edition.  
SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/RESOURCES: The University of Akron librarians designed a tutorial to introduce students to the basic concepts for citing and providing copyright attribution needed class papers.  
BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Using the D2L Brightspace platform to track student progress, four online modules were developed. The tutorial consisted of videos, presentation slides, and quizzes. It combined APA guidelines for citing tables and figures, an overview of the Creative Commons (CC) licenses, finding OERs or Open Educational Resources, and provided examples from various sources (e.g., statistical information from the U.S. Census). To encourage and empower students to reference all works, they will describe how to add the Creative Commons license to their own works and the works of others. Activities involved identifying common elements for citing tables and figures.  
RESULTS/OUTCOME: The modules provided another method for online learning. Recommendations for promoting the modules were shared with the librarians.  
EVALUATION METHOD: The tutorial was pre-tested by students in summer 2021. Student assessment was positive. Faculty members were encouraged to incorporate the tutorial into their lesson planning beginning in fall 2021.  

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Poster

Development of a Counter 5 Quarterly Usage Stats Playbook for Librarians.

Michele Matucheski, Ascension Health Care - Wisconsin.

PURPOSE: Describes the development of a Counter 5 Quarterly Stats Playbook for Librarians to standardize and simplify the data collection and reporting process.  
SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/RESOURCES: Twenty-two healthcare librarians in 20 states reporting selected local library usage statistics.  
BRIEF DESCRIPTIONUnder the guidance of The Library Measurements Team, librarians reported selected usage stats in 2020. For 2021, we needed to upgrade to the Counter 5 (C5) industry standard. Therefore, the team determined what to track going forward. After immersing ourselves in C5, we mapped C5 equivalents to previous metrics, adding improved C5 metrics. To disseminate our recommendations, we created a Playbook with C5 training resources, definitions, worksheets, administrative links, screenshots and explanations for each resource. The Playbook led librarians step-by-step through the new process, addressing a previously unmet need as a job aid for standardizing the collection of usage stats. The Measurements Team charted a path through Counter 5, so that individual librarians did not have to struggle on their own.  
RESULTS/OUTCOME: The Quarterly Stats Playbook resulted in (1) more consistent, cleaner data; (2) faster, more efficient and standardized data collection; and (3) happier librarians who knew how to pull required metrics, how to interpret reports.  
EVALUATION METHOD: Feedback from librarians; analysis of data submitted via the new process determined the utility and impact of The Playbook.  
WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT: This data is used to show the value and fiscal stewardship of library services to executive leadership and stakeholders. 

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Poster

Librarian Involvement in a Literature Review Assignment: Implications for Curriculum Integration and Collection Development.

Heather McEwen, MLIS, MS, Northeast Ohio Medical University, William McEwen, MLIS.

Literature evaluation skills are essential for clinicians to provide excellent patient care. A literature review assignment has traditionally been a part of the evidence-based medicine curriculum for first-year medical students. One or more librarians have been involved with the assignment and evidence-based medicine curriculum since its inception. In 2020, the assignment was moved to the second-year medical curriculum. For the literature review assignment, students must choose a clinical question to research and search for professional resources to answer their clinical question. Paper topic choice can provide information from evidence-based medicine integration within the College of Medicine curriculum to information for library collection development. Literature review topics will be categorized by body system. Presence in the concurrent curriculum will be determined using the College of Medicine’s curriculum map to determine if students are using the assignment one course to help study for their main clinical course. The journals selected by students for their main research article will also be recorded to determine which journals are being utilized by students. This type of research provides numerical results of how library resources are being utilized in the curriculum. It helps the College of Medicine provide evidence of integration. It also provided added data when making decisions about collection development. Librarian involvement in this assignment provides an opportunity for students to meet librarians and learn how they may help them conduct research.  

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Poster

No Library? No Problem! Information Outreach to Health Professionals.

Genova and Riley Sumner, University of Louisville.

OBJECTIVE: To increase awareness of free, professional-level health information resources among healthcare workers without access to medical library services.  
METHODS: There are several hospitals in the Louisville Downtown Medical Center that do not have access to specialized library services, and healthcare professionals from these institutions frequently contact librarians at the University of Louisville seeking help. To help bridge this gap, two librarians at the University of Louisville assembled a list of free health information resources of use to health professionals. Some emphasis was placed on NLM resources due to the library’s status as a GMR Partner Library for the NNLM. A presentation was created that identified places to access free clinical practice guidelines, scientific literature, drug information, travel health information, and clinical trials. A brief demonstration of PubMed searching, with instructions for filtering for freely available articles was provided, as was an introduction to MedlinePlus as a patient resource tool.  
RESULTS: Six local healthcare providers, mostly nurses, attended the live webinar over Zoom. Participants expressed that the webinar was helpful and they planned to use the resources highlighted.  
CONCLUSIONS: The webinar was a success, an additional session has been planned. Future directions include increased marketing for the webinar, so that healthcare professionals outside the Louisville Downtown Medical Center can participate, and more formal evaluation methods for the program. 

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Program Description
Poster

NVivo Consults: Librarians Collaborating with Health Sciences Faculty Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis.

Kerry Dhakal, The Ohio State University.

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate that librarians can add teaching NVivo and other computer assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) to their portfolio of services to health sciences faculty members they collaborate with.  
METHODS: Over the summer and fall 2021 semesters, the presenter will have consulted with health sciences faculty members on using NVivo and conducting qualitative data analysis. She will collect information about what questions she was able to answer about using the software and conducting qualitative data analysis. She will also conduct a brief bibliographic analysis to determine if health sciences faculty in her university are conducting qualitative research and what, if any, software they are using to analyze qualitative data.  
RESULTS: The results of this service initiative pilot is to offer library research consultations on NVivo to health sciences faculty members, looping librarians further into research activities at their universities as collaborators in qualitative research in the health sciences. Results reported will include faculty member demographics, questions asked, answered and referred to methodology experts elsewhere on campus.  
CONCLUSION: The presenter will provide recommendations to librarians about what steps they can take if they choose to learn NVivo or other CAQDAS software and reach out to collaborate and teach health sciences faculty members to use such software as collaborators. Observations about if this type of collaborative research service is scalable will also be included.  

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Midwest, Program Description
Poster

Physician Assistant Student Perceptions of Evidence-Based Medicine Resources.

Brittany R. Heer, MLIS, Butler University Libraries; Chris Roman, MA, MMS, PA-C, Butler University, Department of Physician Assistant Studies; Chris Gillette, PhD, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Physician Assistant Studies; M. Jane McDaniel, MS, MLS(ASCP)SC.

INTRODUCTION: ARC-PA Accreditation Standard (B2.13) requires evidence-based medicine (EBM) instruction to prepare PA students to search and appraise medical literature. This study seeks to understand which EBM resources PA students find most and least useful as well as their self-efficacy in searching and appraising medical literature.  
METHODS: Students at three PA programs completed a cross-sectional questionnaire at the end of their didactic EBM course. The questionnaire included preferences of commonly used secondary and tertiary literature, (e.g., PubMed, Dynamed+, UpToDate), and self-efficacy in searching/appraising the literature. Students were asked to rank their preferred secondary literature databases. Thematic analysis identified the most important student-reported attributes of an EBM resource.  
RESULTS: Eighty-seven (n=87) students completed the questionnaire (39.5% response rate). Students ranked UpToDate as their most preferred EBM tool (M=1.2, SD=0.5) and ranked TRIP as their least preferred EBM tool (M=6.7, SD=1.2). The most important attributes that students reported was ease of use/search (n=22), reliability/quality of the information (n=5), and how the information is presented (n=5). After one EBM course, on average, students rated their self-efficacy searching the literature (M=3.2, SD=0.6) and appraising the literature (M=3.1, SD=0.8) as ‘moderately confident’.  
CONCLUSION: There is a need to improve PA students’ self-efficacy searching and appraising the literature. Faculty should introduce EBM as early as possible into students’ didactic education and reinforce those skills throughout their didactic and clinical education. 

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Research
Poster

Pivot! Virtual Nursing Instruction Services during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Stephanie Henderson, University of Kentucky.

This poster describes how a nursing liaison librarian was successful in pivoting instruction and outreach to a virtual format during the COVID-19 pandemic. The nursing liaison librarian provided instruction and outreach to nursing students in undergraduate, graduate and residency programs. In March of 2020, plans for in person instruction quickly changed to a virtual format. Having previous experience using Canvas, Libguides, and Zoom enabled the librarian to make this a seamless transition. This poster describes the different ways these technologies were utilized to provide students and new nurses with a valuable information on evidence-based practice and new strategies for searching the literature. Canvas and Yuja were utilized for embedding the librarian in individual courses, Libguides provided 24/7 access to collections and tutorials, and Zoom features were used for asynchronous and synchronous instruction. Challenges to these virtual and work from home environments will be presented. The pivot to virtual services enabled to the nursing liaison librarian to provide more targeted and personalized assistance to the students. Best practices for evolving in person instruction to virtual will be highlighted.  

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Midwest, Program Description
Poster

Pod Save You: Assisting the Transition to Audio-Based Asynchronous Learning.

Brandon Patterson, University of Utah; Bryan Hull, University of Utah.

OBJECTIVE: In 2018, an academic health sciences library in the mountain west developed a multimedia studio for students, faculty, and academic staff. Educational projects needing video, audio, and lecture capture could utilize a one-button studio for recording video sessions, microphones for audio, and various screen capture software for lectures. Since the pandemic, this service has seen rapid growth due to academic lectures going exclusively online.  
METHOD: This year we launched a dedicated Podcasting Suite to accommodate the increase in students and faculty needing to record lectures or podcasts for others in the medical profession.  
RESULTS: This poster will outline the process of creating the podcasting suite and provide equipment rosters and methods other libraries may consider for establishing their own podcast studio. We’ll also cover the administration of the studio including: handling reservations, COVID-19 guidelines, use assessment, and integration into the library’s strategic directions. Finally, we’ll cover creating instructables and quick start guides that assist patrons in accomplishing their podcast creations.  
CONCLUSIONS: Podcasts created in the space range from topics about teaching strategies in medicine to diagnoses and treatments of skin disorders. The Podcasting Suite has proven to be another way libraries can provide valuable services for asynchronous learning and student projects. We’ve heard from students, staff and faculty that they appreciate the ease of the service and the support behind it. A feedback loop was developed so we can constantly adapt the space to meet the needs of our users where we respond to requests every quarter. 

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
Poster

Using an Email Template to Increase Library Class Registrations.

Kristen DeSanto, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

OBJECTIVE: At this academic health sciences library, librarians teach an average of 12 classes each month. In the first quarter of 2020, there was an average of 13 registrations per class. The library wanted to increase this number and thought a different marketing strategy could help. Aside from posting class schedules on the library homepage, emails are sent to the campus listserv, which are seen by all students, faculty, and staff. There was no consistency to the emails regarding content or format, so we proposed creating a streamlined but eye-catching template for emails in order to increase registrations.  
METHODS: In developing the email template, four guiding principles were followed: 1) Library brand reinforcement: The subject line begins with the library name followed by class name. The body of the email begins with the library logo and includes an image of the building; 2) Consistency: This template is used for all library classes; 3) Accessibility: All images contain alt text, and URLs are hyperlinked. Text is written in black sans serif font on a white background with a 12-point minimum; and 4) Simplicity: The most important information is placed at the beginning in larger font: class name, date, time, and a link to the registration page. A brief class description is included, but learning objectives are not. Supplementary information is placed at the bottom: course instructor and email, and links to the library chat service and complete class schedule. Results and conclusions to follow. 

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
MCMLA, Program Description
Poster

Working Too Hard: Lack of Partnerships in Nursing Information Literacy Instruction.

Teresa Hartman, University of Nebraska Medical Center; Janna Wrench, Eric Kowalik, and Alissa Fial, Marquette University.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this scoping review is to determine the most effective way to approach information literacy sessions for nursing students: (1) face to face, (2) blended (a combination of tutorial and face to face), (3) or tutorial/online based?  
METHODS: A scoping review of the literature was conducted. One of the medical librarians, trained in systematic reviews, created the search strategy. The team used the following electronic databases: PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, Web of Science, and LSTA. The parameters included an initial focus on nursing students, instruction, information literacy, and assessment methodology. The results were limited to English language with a publication date range of 2008 through 2020. Sample terms include nursing students, e-learning, pedagogy, information literacy, ACRL Framework, and educational measurements. The results yielded 579 articles. After initial title and abstract screening took place, 96 articles were chosen for full-text screening. A total of 19 articles were included in this review.  
RESULTS: Despite many articles quoting ACRL about the need for partnering with librarians for instruction, most of the articles discussed information literacy instruction developed and implemented by instructors with little to no librarian involvement. Another finding was the lack of accurate assessment of students’ knowledge and skill gains. Frequently the assessment involved an end of class self-assessment that asked students to self-identify if they had learned anything. There were great examples of library instructor integration, course assignments, and rubrics that could help other librarians in developing similar course integrations at their institutions.  

Fri 9:00 am - 10:00 am
MCMLA, Program Description
Poster

10:00 am - 11:00 am Keynote Speaker

Ashley Z. Ritter, APRN, Ph.D. (she/her)

11:00 am - 11:45 am Lightning Talks: Session 1

Tracks: DEIA, Profession, & Outreach

11:00 am CT. Building a Dynamic DEI Collaboration in Challenging Times.

Judith Smith and Gurpreet Rana, University of Michigan.

OBJECTIVE: To build a dynamic relationship with an evolving diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) program at the University of Michigan School of Public Health (SPH).  
METHODS: Informationists reached out to SPH's new DEI Program Manager and Implementation Lead in 2017. Public health informationists at the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor developed an initial relationship with DEI staff in the past but due to staff turnover, had been unable to strategically advance a collaboration in an impactful manner. Initial conversations with the new DEI program manager allowed informationists to better assess information needs and to communicate how the library can effectively contribute to the SPH's DEI strategic plan in a multi-pronged approach. Action items coming out of discussions included a range of expert searching topics timely and relevant to student needs addressing topics of global, national and local significance.  
RESULTS: The informationists and program manager used ongoing meetings to focus on relationship-building, and enhanced collaboration. The collaboration became more established due to the urgent need for current information to address the COVID-19 pandemic, social unrest, and focus on racial inequity. The relationship and work of SPH's diversity initiatives was not only a significant contribution to our community but also contributed to the library system's ongoing five-year strategic plan.  
CONCLUSION: Developing and maintaining a DEI collaboration requires proactive relationship-building and personal connections. Additionally, working during this timeframe requires flexibility, as information needs change rapidly. Finally, informationists must be willing to stretch beyond their comfort zone to find alternative content such as microlearnings or other learning objects. 

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
Midwest, Program Description
DEIA Track

11:06 am CT. Does Our Library Walk the Walk? A DEI-Focused Survey of Library Staff.

Emily Glenn, Emily McElroy, and Kim Harp, McGoogan Health Sciences Library, University of Nebraska Medical Center.

OBJECTIVE: One academic medical center library desired information about staff experiences and perceptions of DEI in the library, otherwise unavailable via existing campus surveys. A 2021 survey of library staff provided insight into staff experiences, library climate, and integration of DEI into library work roles.  
METHODS: We developed and deployed a survey to 29 library staff in February 2021. Nine questions were split into sections to focus on climate of the library, climate of the library as experienced as an individual, and reflection. All library staff completed the survey anonymously. Results were shared and discussed with library administration and staff.  
RESULTS: Most staff (76%) could state the university’s core DEI values and describe inclusive library spaces. DEI efforts in library administration were least familiar to staff. Most staff could describe DEI work in staff development and partnerships or that focused on race or sexual orientation. Most staff experienced or observed fairness, caring, equity, and respect from other library staff, but offered less of it to library users.  
CONCLUSIONS: This survey provided space for reflections that seemed to not fit into other venues. Results showed lower awareness of DEI areas library administration had been emphasizing in recent trainings. While discussing results with staff, we identified priorities for future learning and strategic plan ideas. We plan to deploy this survey annually to monitor our progress toward creating a positive climate and supporting staff as they reflect on integrating DEI into library work roles.  

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description
DEIA Track

11:12 am CT. Diversity Equity and Inclusion in the MidContinental Region: Results and Recommendations of a Diversity Scan.

David Brown, University of Wyoming, NNLM Region 4; Crystal L. Hastings, Emporia State University; Ellen Thieme, University of Missouri; Kiara Comfort, MLIS Contract Librarian, Iowa; David Brown, Ed.D., MLIS, NNLM Region 4, University of Wyoming; A James Bothmer, MLS, AHIP, University of Utah Eccles Health Science Library; John C. Bramble, MLIS, Executive Director NNLM, Region 4, Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah.

OBJECTIVES: A study was undertaken to investigate diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) activities by member libraries in the MidContinental Region (MCR) of the Network of The National Library of Medicine (NNLM). Using an environmental scan, best practices are identified to enhance DEI, priorities at libraries. Lessons learned can easily be adapted by other regions and states.  
METHODS: The NNLM MCR conducted an environmental scan of DEI practices among member libraries in the region. The initial steps of this study included investigating websites and published materials of MCR member libraries. Based on this review, themes were identified, and a questionnaire was developed to assess the DEI practices in the region. Data collected included quantitative and qualitative. Data were analyzed using statistical and thematic analysis.  
RESULTS: Results indicated member libraries are concerned about issues of DEI. However, most of the programming being offered at these libraries does not encompass issues of DEI. Specific attention will be placed on the quantitative results of this study.  
CONCLUSIONS: This environmental scan indicates that DEI issues are paramount in the region. This study identifies efforts that could be undertaken to investigate and address issues of DEI in libraries. Issues of DEI must be addressed with a commitment from library administration and staff. One specific approach includes developing a DEI plan for the library. This plan should ensure all library stakeholders are committed to the implementation of the plan. Additional DEI studies should be conducted to provide a national picture of DEI activities in libraries. 

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Research, Student
DEIA Track

11:18 am CT. Falling through the Pipeline: Improving Recruitment Pathways for Health Information and Library Professionals.

Jen Simms and Amy Minix, Indiana University Bloomington.

The Indiana University (IU) Libraries established the Carla J Funk (former MLA Executive Director) Fellowship for students in the IU Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, which includes the Information and Library Science (ILS) degree program, to investigate new service models that intersect with the principles and practices of Interprofessional Practice and Education and Evidence-Based Practice.  
DESCRIPTION: We discuss recruiting challenges that have led to a minimal pool of students interested in this opportunity. This disparity was exposed when the Funk Fellowship received only one viable inquiry from a graduate student not in the Luddy School, despite various recruitment efforts from health sciences librarians and IU Libraries’ donor advancement staff. We explain probable explanations for this at IU and ponder the pathways students may take after high school and arriving in our information and library graduate programs. We seek to understand who gravitates toward health information careers; ways to recruit them as undergraduates; and to ask if outreach to high school students is a sensible approach? This is an exploration using backward induction, “the process of reasoning backwards in time, from the end of a problem or situation, to determine a sequence of optimal actions,” borrowed from its use in game theory. This dialogue will gauge if there is a disconnect between persons prepared for careers in health information and the plethora of open positions in these fields in the United States. In other words, is the lack of interest in the Funk Fellowship a vehicle for a systemic professional problem or perhaps one that exists locally at Indiana University? 

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Profession Track

11:23 am CT. Giving up: Evaluating the Importance of What We Do.

Holly Hubenschmidt, Webster University Libraries.

Libraries are full of talented professionals passionate about providing top-notch service to our users. The library literature brims with articles about new, creative services our colleagues are implementing. The problem is that we are terrible at giving things up. We constantly do more with our users in mind but rarely balance the new workload with the cancellation of old activities and responsibilities. This cycle adds to stress and burnout as we try to surpass our limits. Come learn how one library department found a way to jettison some activities and responsibilities using the Eisenhower matrix to evaluate everything we were doing.  

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
MCMLA, Program Description
Profession Track

11:28 am CT. Improving Information Storage for Online Group Collaboration.

Katie Larsen and Kristi Torp, Emporia State University.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this project was to develop an efficient and human-friendly content management system plan for digital content created by the collaborative business processes and activities of the Network of the National Library of Medicine, Region 4 (NNLM Region 4) at the University of Utah. Over 15 plus years, this program produced large numbers of files created by various people from different institutions resulting in difficulties in file retrieval.  
SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/RESOURCES: While seeking their graduate library science degrees, Katie Larsen and Kristi Torp were presented with an opportunity for practicum experiences working with the NNLM Region 4. They were asked to observe, research, and advise on improvements to the current content management system.  
BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Larsen and Torp studied content management standards of practice as well as researched both personal and group information management systems to comprehend how people organize digital files in shared environments. The students also analyzed the file structures of NNLM Region 4’s data storage drives to better understand and identify potential retrieval inefficiencies. The drives included an abundance of administrative and project-related content. This presentation will discuss the research and evidence gathered that informed Larsen and Torp’s recommendations for the NNLM Region 4 to improve efficiency and increase retrieval performance.  
RESULTS/OUTCOME: After the students completed their analysis, they provided a detailed report instructing the NNLM Region 4 on how to begin practicing file naming standards, using simple folder hierarchy structures, and implementing automation where possible.  
EVALUATION METHOD: Larsen and Torp reviewed the literature and conducted a needs analysis. Each data storage drive was examined for naming and folder hierarchy structure. In one large drive, every folder was counted and represented in a graphic depicting the navigation difficulties of the current system. 

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA, Program Description, Student
Profession Track

11:35 am CT. A Trio of Library Initiatives to Integrate the Arts & Humanities into our Health Community.

Christopher Hooper-Lane, MA, AHIP, and Lia Vellardita, MA, Ebling Library, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

BACKGROUND: There is a growing recognition of the benefits of expanding the arts/humanities in the health sciences. Recognizing this, school leadership tasked our library to develop initiatives to connect the arts and humanities to our patrons. As a result, our library launched three new programs to integrate the arts into our community.  
DESCRIPTION: Our library developed three arts initiatives for our health sciences community: (1) a book/film discussion club providing participants at all levels a venue to discuss relevant books and films; (2) an onsite recreational reading collection (and corresponding website) offering a browsable collection of popular non-fiction, fiction, poetry, and graphic medicine books with health themes and sub-collections on emergent topics; (3) an arts/humanities journal that for our health community to showcase a variety of arts including the written word, visual arts (2D and photos of 3D art), and multimedia audio/video.  
CONCLUSION: All three initiatives have been successfully launched. The book/film club has administered 15 online book/film discussions with a total of 220 participants. Sessions are led by a variety of facilitators from our health community. The recreational reading collection now includes 1200 items and is expected to be fully on display and available for circulation summer 2021. A corresponding website is live using book cover images that can be sorted by sub-collections such as well-being, antiracism, etc. Three issues of our arts journal have successfully published 84 works of art from our health sciences community with 2,950 site hits recorded. 

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Outreach Track

11:40 am CT. Promoting Wellness and Community-Building in our Library Through Virtual Wellness Challenges.

Heidi Greenberg, BS, and Carmin Smoot, MLIS, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library.

OBJECTIVE: A recent workplace survey revealed that 52% of our library employees are currently experiencing burnout, continuing a trend that has remained steady over the last few years. With these results in mind, we seek to address the following issues: How do we avoid placing additional pressure on library employees experiencing the effects of burnout while encouraging engagement in our wellness initiatives? Does our current wellness program promote self-care and consider the difficulties employees are experiencing related to social isolation, higher stress, greater anxiety, and emotional exhaustion?  
METHODS: Our wellness team recognizes that employee engagement is varied in a remote work environment. Accordingly, we decided to promote a wide range of virtual wellness offerings, including: 1) Introduction of quarterly challenges that aim to prioritize mental health, build resilience, contribute to positive morale, and promote healthy lifestyle choices; 2) Consistent posting of wellness resources on departmental communication platform; 3) On-going wellness seminars and community building “break-out” rooms as part of our regular staff meetings; 4) Successful shift of formerly in-person wellness activities to the virtual environment.  
RESULTS: We conducted a survey to gauge participation in wellness activities and to solicit ideas for future wellness plans. We learned that providing options and variety in activities and resources encouraged engagement and that it is possible to use the wellness program to alleviate burnout and improve connections with our colleagues.  
CONCLUSION: We have successfully implemented a culture of wellness within our remote work environment. Library employees are invested and engaged in our wellness program.  

Fri 11:00 am - 11:45 am
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Research
Outreach Track

11:45 am - 12:45 pm Lunch Break Day 3

Snap a picture or share your thoughts at #MidwestMCMLA2021

12:45 pm - 1:30 pm Research Program Session 3: Papers

Track: Facilities

1:06 pm CT. Creating a Dedicated XR Classroom.

Brandon Patterson and Tallie Casucci, University of Utah

OBJECTIVE: Immersive technologies, such as Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and Extended Reality (XR), are quickly moving from a source of entertainment into a new technology for education. Over the past few years, there has been an increased demand for VR/AR/XR modules that help students learn, especially for health sciences education; however, there are relatively few examples of deploying these educational modules in a dedicated physical classroom. A health sciences library has led the effort in researching current XR classrooms and creating an XR classroom based upon these best practices, recommendations, and potential needs.  
METHODS: We conducted a literature search related to in-person physical classrooms using XR technology. An open Google Sheet was shared with an internal VR interest group to solicit names of existing physical classroom spaces. Using information from the literature review and VR interest group, virtual interviews were conducted with the managers of these spaces. The interview questions concerned topics such as recommended equipment and space, advertising, and building partnerships.  
RESULTS: A report indicates best practices and design solutions for an XR classroom. It also provides recommendations that address challenges including: assessing VR modules in the marketplace, supporting an educational repository, education/training, and a support model for the classrooms.  
CONCLUSIONS: A temporary space has been set up to trial an XR classroom for health sciences learners and will be available for the Fall 2021 semester. A built-out XR classroom space will be built permanently in the library in 2023.  

Fri 12:45 pm - 1:30 pm
MCMLA, Program Description
Facilities Track

12:45 pm CT. Together for the First Time in a Renovated Library.

Emily McElroy and Emily Glenn, McGoogan Health Sciences Library, University of Nebraska Medical Center

OBJECTIVE: A large academic health sciences library completed a two-year renovation in 2021. Beyond standard library space for studying and collections, the library engaged with campus partners to bring different services to the renovated library. The library aimed to offer the best blend of services for a modern academic health center.  
METHODS: During the renovation planning process, the library engaged with leaders across campus to design spaces for library partners around core library services. While some partners already had space in the library, the planning process allowed for a more thoughtful partner layout. Throughout the renovation, library administration worked with partners on their needs for interaction and service areas, offices, furniture, and information technology. After reopening, library administration welcomed two new partners into the library.  
RESULTS: Faculty and student services units manage spaces such as an e-learning lab, simulation labs, faculty commons, writing center, maker studio, reflection rooms, an inclusion corner, and academic success center. Users have provided comments about how the new spaces in the library are meeting their academic, social, and personal needs. Passively gathered usage statistics offered a window into trends in space use. Open house events in fall provided substantial feedback from people seeing the new space for the first time.  
CONCLUSIONS: Faculty, staff, and students have welcomed the centralized services in the library. The partner spaces provide library users a suite of services for collaboration and consultation with the library serving as a central campus hub. Expanding the presence of partners in the library’s renovated space has elevated the library's profile and generated exciting buzz on campus. 

Fri 12:45 pm - 1:30 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), MCMLA
Facilities Track

1:30 pm - 2:15 pm Medical Library Association Update

Kristine M. Alpi, MLA President (she/her)

2:15 pm - 2:30 pm Break Day 3

Stretch time!

2:30 pm - 3:15 pm Lightning Talks: Session 2

Tracks: Collaboration and Information Services

2:30 pm CT. Librarians and Nurses Collaborate on Journal Clubs for Critical Appraisal and Improved Evidence Based Practice.

Kaitlyn Van Kampen, MLIS, and Holiday Vega, MSW, MLISc, The University of Chicago; Nicole L. Bohr, PhD, RN, The University of Chicago Medicine.

PURPOSE: This lightning talk examines the preparation and implementation of workshops and a journal club created by librarians and nurses to learn critical appraisal and enhance evidence based practice.  
BACKGROUND: The Nursing Evidence-Based-Practice and Research Council (NERC) at an academic hospital identified a need for nurses and nurse researchers to understand how to critically appraise research articles, specifically how to identify bias. The nursing librarian is a member of this council.  
APPROACH: The nurse liaison librarian and the clinical librarian worked to develop a critical appraisal educational intervention and implementation strategy within the hospital’s nursing units. The librarians collaborated with NERC to present a session on critical appraisal at Nursing Grand Rounds, and created a journal club for nurses to practice the skills learned on identifying bias. The NERC journal club began in July 2021 and was open to all nursing staff. Topics for the first three sessions focused on implementing journal clubs in individual nursing units and/or specialty areas to gain a better understanding of how journal clubs enhance critical appraisal skills and how to apply these skills to the nursing profession. Additional support was provided in the form of a journal club toolkit developed in coordination by NERC and the librarians.  
NEXT STEPS: With support from a nurse scientist, this team will develop and launch a research study focused on the impact of journal club participation and critical appraisal of evidence-based practice and research articles on the nurse profession with specific focus on evidence-based practice self-efficacy.  

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Midwest, Program Description
Collaboration Track

2:36 pm CT. Librarian Contributions to a Manuscript Writing Intensive for Health Researchers.

Elizabeth Suelzer, Medical College of Wisconsin.

BACKGROUND: In early 2020, an experienced academic writing coach developed a 10-week Manuscript Writing Intensive to support the dissemination efforts of the health researchers in our consortium of eight local institutions. Participants in the writing intensive included anyone who was affiliated with the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and was currently working on an article manuscript. The objective of this hands-on small group course was for participants to use the weekly two-hour sessions and 4 hours of homework to support each other in completing a publishable manuscript within the span of the course. The instructor contacted me, a medical librarian, for assistance and to explore opportunities for collaboration.  
DESCRIPTION: The instructor met with me for an orientation to the resources and staff expertise available for participants. We then met again to brainstorm segments of the course that I could lead. I developed one-hour virtual presentations for the first two sessions that covered ORCID, citation managers, finding the right journal, and literature searching. Each presentation was followed by a discussion period where participants shared their publishing experiences and asked questions. I repeated this for all four cohorts. Overall course feedback highlighted the value of these librarian-led sessions.  
CONCLUSIONS: With the first iteration of the course deemed a success, plans were made to offer the series quarterly and expand the number of cohorts. To accommodate the increased number of sessions, I produced video tutorials of my presentations as foundational information for assigned homework. These videos are posted on YouTube and on our LibGuides and are included in the course materials. Library collaboration on this dissemination initiative accelerated the development of the course, promoted participant learning, and showcased the expertise of librarians.  

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
Midwest, Program Description
Collaboration Track

2:42 pm CT. Offering Online Training in Infographic Design through an Expert Speaker Event.

Rosie Hanneke and Tina Griffin, University of Illinois Chicago Library of the Health Sciences.

BACKGROUND: Infographics can visually communicate complex information in a manner easily understood by the reader. Those working in health professions increasingly seek to communicate health information to patients and community members through this medium. In April 2021, our library held a virtual symposium, bringing together three expert speakers to convey the basic principles of design and health communication necessary for understanding what makes an infographic effective.  
DESCRIPTION: We received funding for the three expert speakers from the Network of the National Library of Medicine's Expert Speaker Award. The speakers included faculty from our university's Schools of Design and Public Health, and a librarian with expertise in data visualization from outside our university. The talks covered infographics and health equity; design principles; and using common software to create infographics. The event was open to students, faculty, staff, and the public. We publicized the symposium through listservs, the library's regular communication channels, and the network of community organizations established through university researchers. The symposium was recorded for those unable to attend.  
CONCLUSION: 200 people registered, nearly 100 attended, and over 100 viewed the recording. We had an overwhelmingly positive response to this event despite a compressed timeline for publicity and promotion, demonstrating a strong interest in this topic across diverse audiences. The library served as the ideal virtual gathering place for this interdisciplinary event. 

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
Program Description
Collaboration Track

2:48 pm CT. Conceptualizing Information Literacy Curricula in the Health Sciences: Preliminary Results of a Scoping Review.

Devon Olson, Megan Denis, Shannon Yarborough, Sandi L. Bates, Montanna Barnett, Erika Johnson, and Jessica Gilbert Redman, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

OBJECTIVE: In 2020, the University of North Dakota’s School of Medicine and Health Sciences librarians undertook a scoping review to inform departmental development of a medical-school-specific information literacy (IL) curriculum. The ultimate purpose is to map instruction to disciplinary curricula and accreditation standards, while retaining a shared understanding of IL with their colleagues.  
METHODS: Database searches included concept terms for IL, curricula, librarians, medical or health science context, and higher education. Initial results numbered 1,090 articles. After de-duplication, 681 articles remained, with a relevancy review leaving 392 articles for full review. The extraction instrument collects data on researchers, participants, article context, and research methods, with particular attention to what IL concepts or skills are conceptualized.  
RESULTS: Article coding is ongoing, but preliminary data sampling reveals that, though rarely analyzed on its own as a concept, there is remarkable diversity in how IL is conceptualized and implemented in medical school contexts. Case studies on instruction report varied structures, from single sessions to system-wide for-credit courses and focus on concrete skills; navigating information architecture and evaluating evidence are mentioned most often, with scholarly communication or equity in information access being rare. Only a small subset of articles map curricula to specific IL frameworks or evidence-based practice.  
CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary sampling suggests a gap in the research, where many case studies on librarian instruction gloss IL skills, but few conceptualize those skills within a comprehensive curricula, or map them to equivalent skills outlined in the accreditation documents of the departments with which they liaise. 

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Research
Information Services Track

2:53 pm CT. What I Will Take Forward in Instructional Practice Post-Covid?

Merle Rosenzweig, Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan.

The National Institutes of Health's Public Access Policy was mandated on April 7, 2008. Since the National Institutes of Health Health’s Public Access Policy was launched, librarians and informationists have provided support and instruction to those needing to comply with it. Because NIH will hold up funding, it is imperative that NIH grantees comply. Navigating the complex process required in successfully complying can be a daunting task for both grantees and their support safe. Before the Covid lockdown at our institution I presented in-person workshops to our NIH grantees and their support staff charged that supported them in complying with the Policy. In March 2020, my institution was locked down, so the in-person workshops on the NIH Public Access Policy were no longer an option for me. This presentation will discuss how the change was made so that I was able to continue providing the workshops. The change that was needed to continue providing the workshops on compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy will influence my future instructional practices beyond Covid.  

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
Midwest
Information Services Track

2:59 pm CT. To Zoom or Not to Zoom?

Ellie Svoboda, Strauss Health Sciences Library, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

OBJECTIVES: During the COVID-19 pandemic, this academic health sciences library transitioned 100% of library classes online. As the campus reopened in the fall, this project determined which library classes should continue to be offered online, return to in-person, or adopt a hybrid schedule.  
METHODS: Using data from a routinely administered teaching assessment survey, the free-text comments were coded for indications of preference for a modality (online or in person). These preferences were grouped into trends and correlated with types of classes. This information was compared with the content of the class and the needs for instruction.  
RESULTS: Roughly 5% of comments expressed a modality preference. Of these, 50% expressed a preference for online instruction and 50% for in-person instruction. The comments in favor of online instruction indicate that the virtual modality is reaching a set of patrons who would otherwise be unable to attend library classes. 43% of comments regarded the library’s EndNote classes, with two-thirds expressing a preference for in-person instruction and one-third expressing a preference for online instruction.  
CONCLUSION: This data helped the library determine the modality of classes for the fall. It was determined that classes would continue to be offered online; however, in the spring semester if COVID conditions improve, EndNote will be prioritized to return to in-person instruction, while still offering an online class intermittently. Data will continue to be collected over the fall semester and will be incorporated into the decision making for the spring semester. 

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
MCMLA, Program Description
Information Services Track

3:05 pm CT. While You Were Out: Messages from an Examination of Chat Queries During COVID-19 Shutdown.

Cynthia Flanagan, University of Missouri Kansas City.

OBJECTIVE: Librarians at the Health Sciences Campus frequently engage with students and residents when we accompany them on hospital rounds. I would like to examine the kinds of questions asked via chat and email when students had no access to librarians or the library space to determine what types of information or instruction is most difficult to access without guidance.  
METHODS: Library staff from all campuses use Gimlet to record reference interactions via chat, email, and phone. Chat questions are not routed to Health Sciences Library staff, so anyone can answer a chat. All interactions logged can be tagged with terms (like “health sciences” or “medicine”) for later searches. I will download all of the Gimlet entries from March 12, 2020 until August 24, 2020 when the libraries were closed for COVID restrictions, and look for chats with related labels to assess the amount of queries our population produced. I will examine the means of contact (chat/email) and categorize the queries into types: Reference Questions, Apps and Databases, Building Access, Technical Support, and Other.  
RESULTS/CONCLUSION: This query examination will give the Health Sciences Library insight into the information needs of our student and resident population. Though many questions will be traditional reference questions, or pertain to temporary COVID restrictions, we can use the additional information to assure all chat staff at all locations can easily and quickly access information specific to our users, and assess the way we display information about frequently used resources on our website.  

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
MCMLA
Information Services Track

3:10 pm CT. Dynamic Design: Creating Aan Intuitive Search Experience for a Library Resources Page.

Michelle Keba Knecht and Tiffany Follin, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University.

In this brief lightning talk, the presenters will describe how they used feedback from their College of Medicine to re-design their medical library resources webpage. In a recent survey of their medical students, the presenters found that complicated access to library resources via the Medical Library’s website was one of the top barriers to library access experienced by students. Rather than designing a webpage built by and for librarians, the presenters intentionally incorporated direct feedback from students, staff, and faculty as they built the new site to meet the needs of their end users. The presenters will briefly describe the project management and technical aspects of completing a re-design of a library resources page, and participants who are interested in learning more can view the redesigned website and contact the presenters for further information. 

Fri 2:30 pm - 3:15 pm
First-time Chapter Presenter (*), Program Description
Information Services Track

3:20 pm - 3:30 pm Closing Remarks

Final thoughts #MidwestMCMLA2021

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Chapter Meetings

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