Survey! Instruction in Course Management Software

Does your library use Blackboard, WebCT, Moodle, Angel, or another Course Management or Learning Management System for library instruction? If so, you are being invited to participate in a brief survey. The purpose of this national study is to determine how health sciences librarians are using Course or Learning Management Systems. Specifically, what content are you providing with this delivery method and what are the technology’s existing limitations?

The results of this research will be presented at the upcoming 2011 MLA annual meeting in Minneapolis, MN, and potentially submitted for future publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Please take ten minutes to complete the brief online survey that can be accessed at the following URL:  http://jmu.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_2iqX1AcwwLPyu8I
Please complete this survey by March 15, 2011.

Thank you in advance for your willingness to complete the survey! Please feel free to share with colleagues directly involved in library instruction and course management software.

With appreciation,

Stefanie E. Warlick and Tierney Lyons

No music on my iPod?

I love my Christmas present iPod, but I have yet to download any music. I subscribe to a number of podcasts and listen during my daily commute. Today, on my way to Columbus for a 2009 Midwest Chapter conference planning committee meeting, I listened to last week’s SirsiDynix Institute podcast Maximizing the Power of the Web: Pew Internet & American Life Project’s 2007 Findings. Lee Rainie, Director Pew Internet & American Life Project reviewed the results of a their 2007 survey on how people use the internet, libraries, and government agencies when they need help. The presentation was interesting, but the very poor technical quality of the audio made listening challenging.
Although the results pertained mostly to public library use, I found two items interesting in the results. I refer you to the presentation slides for supporting numerical details. First, young adults, ages 18-29, turn to libraries for problem solving (slide 32). In my hospital, folks in this age group are my library’s most frequent users — students, residents, younger nursing staff. They are used to using the library for school and continue to turn to the library for information assistance even after graduation. Second, people who have internet access at home still use the library (slide 25). “The internet isn’t your enemy, it’s your ally.” (slide 40)
What do you think?